TITLE Accounting Clerk Guide, Instructor Packet--Part I. A Spec - Eric

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CE 005 305 Foster, Brian; And Others Accounting Clerk Guide, Instructor Packet--Part I. A Spec Unit for the 10th, 11th, or 12th Grade. A Career Education Unit (An Edited Developmental Draft). Mesa Public Schools, Ariz. Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix. VT-102-085 Jun 73 144p.; For related documents, see CE 005 306-312

MF-$0.76 HC-$6.97 Plus Postage *Accounting; *Answer Keys; Business Education; Clerical Occupations; Individualized Instruction; Pilot Projects; Post Testing; Pretests; *Secondary Education; *Teaching Guides; Unit Plan

ABSTRACT

The instructor packet is part of an eight volume unit for grades 10, 11, and 12, designed for individualized progression in preparing students for entry into the occupation of accounting clerk. The instructor packet lists performance objectives, vocabulary, learning tasks, and supplemental activities for lessons 1 through 11. It also includes pretest and post-test keys. The unit is concerned with the basic accounting theory found in the accounting cycle. The material presented is closely coordinated with the other documents in the eight volume accounting unit. (NJ)

*********************************************************************** * Documents acquired by ERIC include many informal unpublished * * materials not available from other sources. ERIC makes every effort * * to obtain the best copy available. Nevertheless, items of marginal * * reproducibility are often encountered and this affects the quality * * of the microfiche and hardcopy reproductions ERIC makes available * * via the ERIC Document Reproduction Service (EDRS). EDRS is not * * responsible for the quality of the original document. Reproductions * * supplied by EDRS are the best that can be made from the original. * ***********************************************************************

AN INSTRUCTIONAL UNIT

LiwAt

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THIS DOCUMENT HAS SEEN REPRO. FROM DUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVEDORIGIN THE PERSON OR ORGANIZATION ATING IT POINTS OF VIEW OR OPINIONS

REPRE STATED 00 NOT NECESSARILY INSTITUTE OF SENT OFFICIAL NATIONAL EDUCATION POSITION OR POLICY

PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE T ToS COPY RIGHTED MATERIAL 4AS BEEN GRANTED BY

AD.1 Z..4 J-r

)121

TO ERIC AND ORGANIZATIONS OPERATING UNDER AGREEMENTS WITH THE NATIONAL IN

STITuTE OF EDUCATION FURTHER REPRO DUCTION OUTSIDE THE ERIC SYSTEM RE OUIRES PERMISSION OF THE COPYRIGHT OWNER

0

INSTRUCTOR PACKET

Q

ACCOUNTING CLERK

ct)

0

GUIDE

PART,1

UNIT WAS DEVELOPED AND PRINTED WITH FUNDS APPROPRIATED UNDER MATERIAL IS DISTRIBUTED FOR PILOT TEST ONLY AND IS SUBJECT TO

15 - 1199. REVISION.

Arizona Department of Education W P Shofstall, Superintendent

a

ACCOUNTING CLERK GUIDE A SPEC UNIT FOR THE 10TH, 11TH, OR 12TH GRADE

A CAREER EDUCATION UNIT

AN EDITED DEVELOPMENTAL DRAFT)

originally developed by: Brian Foster Mary Lou Irwin Diane Olson

VT-

02.- ogS

MESA PUBLIC SCHOOLS June, 1973

3

.41 41

This Career Education instructional unit was developed pursuant to a grant from the Arizona State Department of Education. However, the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the Arizona State Department of Rducation, and no or'fiThis unit is in cial endorsement should be inferred. ics prepilot state and is subject to r(,vision. Copyright 1973

CAREER EDUCATION RATIONALE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

3

INSTRUCTOR PACKET

5

Purpose of Unit Unit Design General Directions for the Use of the Unit Instructor's Master Copy for the Learner Information Sheet Directions for Use of the Optional Diagnostic Instruments Instructor Record Sheets Lessons - Basic Accounting Theory Beginning a System for Accounting 1. How to Record the Opening Entry 2. How to Post the Opening Entry 3. 4. How Business Transactions Affect Balance Sheet Accounts How Business Transactions Affect 5. Income and Expense Accounts 6. How to Record Business Transactions in the Journal How to Post Journal Entries to the 7. Ledger How to Prove the Accuracy of Posting. 8. How to Prepare a Six-Column Work 9. Sheet, an Income Statement, and a Balance Sheet How to Close the Ledger 10. Self-Evaluation 11. .

.

iii J

.

.

7 9 .

11 13 15 17

.

23 37 45

59 67 75

87 .

103

123 133 141

A

APPENDIX

Bookkeeping, Recordkeeping, and Accounting Aptitude Test - Directions for the Instructor.

.

.151

Bookkeeping, Recordkeeping, and Accounting Aptitude Test

153

Bookkeeping, Recordkeeping, and Accounting Aptitude Test Key

169

Questionnaire

177

187

BIBLIOGRAPHY

iv

6

-v

CAREER EDUCATION RATIONALE

"Reinforcing the three R's - relevance through Career Education" is the refrain echoing across the country today.

Career Education combines the academic world with the world of work. It must be available at all levels of education from kindergarten through the university. A complete program of Career Education includes awareness of,the world of work, broad exploration of occupations, in depth exploration of selected clusters, and career preparation for all students. This calls for all basic educational subjects to incorporate Career Education as the major activity throughout the curriculum.

GOALS OF CAREER EDUCATION

LEARNING TO LIVE - means promoting the learners' awareness of their capabilities and developing their ability to deal with leisure time and society in general. involves motivating the learners so LEARNING TO LEARN that they want to learn the basic educational subjects. This can be done by making the subjects meaningful and by relating them to the real worldof work.

LEARNING TO MAKE A LIVING - means preparing learners so that they have the capability to support themselves economically and to become productive members of the community.

7

6

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

The Center for Career Development of the Mesa Public Schools would like to gratefully acknowledge permission from SouthWestern Publishing Company to use accounting forms and materials from Century 21 Accounting Teacher's Reference Guide and 20th Century Bookkeeping and Accounting Working Pagers and Study Guides in the Accounting Clerk Guide.

The materials were reproduced by special permission of the publisher from Lewis D. Boynton et. al., Century 21 Accounting Teacher's Reference Guide (Cincinnati:

South-Western Publishing

Co., 1972), pp. F-1 through F-28, and Lewis D. Boynton et. al., 20th Century Bookkeeping and Accounting Working Papers and Study Guides (Cincinnati:

South-Western Publishing Co.,

1967), pp. 117, 231, 234, 255, 256, and 258.

8 3

INSTRUCTOR'S PACKET

dIN=11&

PURPOSE OF UNIT This unit is designed to provide the knowledge necessary for entry into a position of accow.ting clerk. Opportuniries are included to learn accounting theory, payroll system, and a knowledge of data processing as it applies to acouniting.

At two different times, the learner will be asked to review and evaluate his performance in the lessons, and express an opinion concerning the job of accounting clerk as a possible career choice. The basic accounting skills that the learner acquires will also help him manage personal business affairs and provide a foundation for future study in accounting. Part I of the unit is concerned with the basic accounting theory found in the accounting cycle.

7

UNIT DESIGN

This unit has been written for use at the 10th, 11th, and 12th grade levels. It is designed for individualized progression, with a suggested time schedule that may serve as a pacing device for the ].earner. The unit may also be used with large and sitiall groups of learners. The lessons are designed for use with a high school accounting textbook such as Century 21 Accounting or Accounting 10/12, Second Edition.

There are four sections in this unit - an Instructor's Packet, a Learner's Packet, an Exercise and Worksheet Packet, and a Test Packet. "'The Instructor's Packet includes an overview of what the learner is doing, a listing of the performance objectives, a suggested lesson time, a list of new vocabulary words used in the lesson, and instructions that are needed to guide the learner through each lesson. A listing of the learn is t::sks, a list of supplemental activities and the pretest and posttest keys for the lesson are also included. It is.reco,:mended that instructor read through the Learner's Packet. The 7,,-).61-nct's Packet contatas everything the learner will need I:6r the lessons with the exception of the tc-E7s e.,nd th7) ,:orl
worCs, orsaquisite knoulcdge he will need, and special concerns that are unique to the lesson. He is given etc02-by-Jtsf, i;Istructions for each task. The packet 1,:il%shecats and exercise sheets, along with any

self-nck ksys be ne7As. The and Workheet Packet contains a copy of every we,rkshezt and exercise sheet the learner has in pact. The instructor can duplicate these pages if t',,? r%c%et itself is to be saved for other learners. H will need to instruct the learner to use the sheets he gi',;es hial rather than the ones in his packet.

The T.747.,Packet includes only the pretests and posttests. This ra,les the tests easier to find when the learner vants theta and east sr to dur)licte. Under "Assessment Pro.::caures" in each lesson the instructor will be given instructions on how to score the pre- and posttests.

911

18

This unit lends itself to many learning situations, such as the open classroom, flexible scheduling, and the nongraded class. During the first two meetings, two accounting orientation prognostic tests may be administered to the learner. At the third meeting each learner will fill out a quesThese prognostic instruments will help the tionnaire. instructor learn more about the individuals involved in The proper prescription of individual learning the unit. activities depends upon how well the instructor knows his students.

10

12

GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR USE OF THE UNIT

The instructor should be available to assist the learner and evaluate the learning activities. Completed learning activities that are submitted to the instructor will have a cover sheet where he may respond to the learner's work and comments. The Teacher's Edition of the Working Papers and Study Guides for Century 21 Accounting or the workbook key for other accounting textbooks that may be used with the unit should be made available to the learner so that he may check work assigned in the lessons. The instructor will administer the pretests and posttests when the learner requests them. The instructor and learner will discuss each posttest. If the learner does not satisfactorily complete the posttest, additional assignments from the list of supplemental materials in the instructor's packet may be assigned before the posttest is taken again. When the learner has satisfactorily completed the posttest, he may go on to the next lesson. At specific intervals the instructor will require the Learner to complete all posttests before proceeding in the unit, if the learner has not successfully completed a pretest or posttest for each performance objective. The instructor and the learner will keep a record of all performance objectives completed by the learner. If the adding machine and/or calculating machine are used with the unit, the instructor shoula be familiar witn their :roper use so tnat ne may inscruct the learner in the proper use of the machine.

311

INSTRUCTOR'S MX6fER COPY FOR THE

LEARNER INFORMATION SHEET

COVER SHEET THIS SHEET MUST BE COMPLETED IN FULL. Name

Period No.

Problems

Date nu

For Instructor's Use PROMPTNESS Ahead of Schedule

On Schedule

I 1.? k

F-1

Behind Schedule

NEATNESS

Satisfactory F-1

Unsatisfactory

n

CONTENT Complete

Incomplete

F-1

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

r-]

ATTACH THIS SHEET TO ASSIGNED TASKS ...ff.....

... -

13

14

I

DIRECTIONS FOR USE OF THE OPTIONAL DIAGNOSTIC INSTRUMENTS

At the beginning of the accounting unit, two accounting orientati.on prognostic tests may by administered to each learner. I The results of these tests would be compared with the learner's stanine scores and his past gradepoint average. If a learner falls below average in all of these areas, the instructor may encourage the learner to re-evaluate his program. After completing the prognostic tests, each learner may fill out a questionna4e that asks some very specific and general questions. 4 The instructor will be looking for such things as how well the learner is able to organize his thoughts, the legibility of his handwriting, and his skill with the English language. The general tone of the learner's answers may offer a clue to the individual's personality. Does he reveal a negative or positive attitude? Do his answers indicate a tendency to be naive? Is he an introvert or an extrovert? A learner's likes and dislikes usually affect his work to a large extent. Therefore, in the questionnaire the instructor will ask some direct questions: "What do you like about your high school? How may this course help you get a job when you leave school? What do you dislike most about courses at this school?" During the unit the instructor will gather additional data through personal interviews. Many learners will reveal, in private, their interests and desires. The proper prescription of individual learning activities hinges on how well the instructor knows the learner. The instructor must ].earn all he can about each individual in his class. He needs to know each learner before he can successfully begin to assign projects pertinent to the learner's individual needs.

2

See Appendix, page 153. See Appendix, page 177.

INSTRUCTOR RECORD SHEET

Lesson Name

2

1

Pre

Post

Pre

Comments :

1.617

3

Pos t

Pre

4

Post

Pre

Pos t

s

INSTRUCTOR RECORD SHEET 'Lesson

Name

6

5

Pre

Post

Pre

Comments:

19

17

7

Post

Pre

Post

Pre

Post

t

0

INSTRUCTOR RECORD SHEET

Lesson

Name

10

9

Pre

Post

Pre

11

Post

Pre

Post

1

Comments:

21

/8

S

LESSON ONE

BEGINNING A SYSTEM FOR ACCOUNTING

PURPOSE

This lesson is designed to teach the first phase of starting an accounting system, utilizing the accounting equation.

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

Given a list of working environment factors for the occupation accounting clerk, the learner will identify those factors that relate to the occupation. Given a list of account titles, the learner will identify the accounts as assets, liabilities, or capital accounts. The I9arner will list five steps in preparing a ;:alance sheet.

Given the names of accounts, the account balances, and a balance sheet form, the learner will prepare a balance sheet. :"...:-,..."-"'Z.":"..._...---......-.

LESSON TIME

Pretest 30 minutes Worksheet - 15 minutes Lesson - 75 minutes Posttest - 30 minutes

23

2,9

NEW VOCABULARY Asset

Capital

Liability

Accountant

Proprietor

Accounting clerk

Balance sheet

Accounting

Accounting equation

Accounting records

RESOURCES INCLUDED WITH LESSON Instructor's Packet

Pretest Key Posttest Key

Learner's Packet

Test Packet

Learner Record Sheet 1

Pretest Posttest

Job and Skill Description Worksheet

Exercise and Worksheet Packet Job and Skill Description Worksheet

Exercise Sheet

Job and Skill Description' Worksheet gey:.

Exercise Sheet

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OR CONCERNS Provide the learner with a balance sheet (account form) for the pretest and posttest (Teacher's Reference Guide, page F-23).

24

20

OVERVIEW

A Job and Skill Description worksheet will introduce the learner to the accounting clerk profession and accounting clerk guide. The learner will be introduced to several accounting terms, become familiar with the accounting equation, learn to classify account titles according to assests, liabilities, and capital, and prepare a balance sheet according to the five steps illustrated in the textbook.

LEARNER TASKS 1.

Read and respond to the Job and Skill DescripIf the learner has any question worksheet. tions or comments concerning the material, he should discuss them with the instructor.

2.

Read the textbook cattgL.x211intin, Chapter 1, pages 3 through 11. (An alternate resource that the learner main use is Accounting 10/12, Chapter 1, pages 2 through 15.)

3.

Complete Drills 1-01 and 1-D3, pages 13 and 14 (A in the Century 21 Accountira textbook. corresponding exaroise-in the Accounting 10/12 The learner textbook is Problem 5, page 10.) will check his work by using the teacher's edition of the workbook that is made available to him by the instructor.

4.

Describe and sequence the five steps in preparing a balance sheet. An explanation and illt,stration of each step may be found on pages 3 through 10 in CeAtury 21 Accounting (Accountllj0/12, pages 13 through 15. )

5.

Complete Problems 1-1, 1-2, and 1-3, pages 14 and 15 in Century 21 Accounting_ (Accounting 10/12, Problems 10 tnrouh 13, page 15 and 17. 7e learner will use the teachers edition of the workbook to check his work.)

A helpful suggestion that you may give the learners at this time is that he must learn to "divorce" himself from the illustration in the book as quickly as possible. 25

SUPPLEMENTAL ACTIVITIES 1.

Instructor-Directed Alternative:

After the learner has read Chapter 1, pages 1 through 11, in the textbook Century 21 Accounting (Accounting 10112, Chapter 1, pages 2 through 15), present a lecture with emphasis on the following points: a.

b. c. d.

Bookkeeping terms and classification of accounts: assets, liabilities, and capital Balance sheet Procedures for preparing a balance sheet Accounting equation

2.

After the learner has completed the Job and Skill Description worksheet, the instructor should provide time during the period for class discusSion and questions.

3.

A bookkeeping filstrip, Part I, The Opening Phase of Bookkeeping, Catalog No. B854, South-Western Publishing Company, may be shown and discussed in the classroom. The instructor may use the following tasks from Century 21 Accounting in conjunction with the lesson for an accelerated learner. a. b.

5.

Cases 1, 2, and 3, page 13 Bonus Problem 1-B, page 16

The instructor may use the following additional tasks from Century 21 Accounting in conjunction with the lesson. a. b. c.

d. e.

Master Problem 1-M, page 16 Review Problems 1-R1 and 1-R2, page 698 Study Guide 1 in workbook Study Questions (all), page 12 Drill 1-D2, page 13

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES

In order to pass the pretest, the learner should have

a score of 90 percent or better. If he. passes the pretest, he may progress to the next lesson. In order to pass the posttest, the learner should have a score of 90 perpent or better.

LESSON ONE

PRETEST KEY

From the list below, identify and check the working environment factors such as tasks, tools, procedures, and

1.

conditions ttat tel&EE-fo 'tliE-66cup-ation accounting clerk.

X

a.

Performs repetitive tasks

X

b.

Follows strict procedures

c.

Markets products and services

d.

Lifts and carries office machines

e.

Advances to full-charge bookkeeper

f.

Stands and walks while performing work

X

g.

Computes the payroll and payroll taxes

X

h.

Prepares monthly statements for customers

X

X

X

2.

Experiences a great deal of close eye work j.

Reads, writes, and types routine correspondence

k.

Schedules work activities for other office personnel

1.

Obtains and verifies source documents containing financial data

Write the account titles from the list below in the space provided under the correct account classification. Cash Delivery Equipment Tom Lambert's Garage (creditOr) Office Furniture Factory Building Paul Franklin, Capital Bell Telephone Company Arizona Wholesale Company (creditor)

24

29

Office Equipment Machinery Land Automobile U.S. Government Bonds Tom Lee, Capital Cleaning Supplies

Lesson 1

PRETEST KEY (Continued) 2.

(Continued)

Liabilities

Assets Cash Delivery Equipment Office Furniture Factory Building Office Equipment Machinery Land Automobile U.S. Gov't Bonds Cleaning Supplies

3.

Tom Lambert's Garage Pell Te.,?phone Co.

Arizona Wholesale Co.

Capital Paul Franklin, Capital Tom Lee, Capital

List-the wive steps used in preparing a Dalance sheet. a.

Write the heading.

b.

Prepare the asset section.

c.

Prepare the liability section

d.

Prepare the capital section.

e.

Balance and rule the balance sheet. to

30

elP C.'

K. 0

Lesson 1

PRETEST KEY (Continued) 4.

Prepare a balance sheet for John's Swimming Pool Service. Use the date March 1 of the current year. The following are the assets and the liabilities of John's Swimming Pool Service, owned and operated by John Simms. Assets

Cash Truck Office Equipment Pool Cleaning Equipment

$

844.00 2,266.00 480.00

2,660.00

Liabilities

Tom Lambert's Garage National Pool Company

/

/u2iLe

,64alea,44.AL..

......22.141.227 /9-

31

110.00 785.00

L1=7

N ONE KEY

1.

From the list below, identify and check the working environment factors such as tasks, tools, procedures, and conditions that relate to the occupation accounting clerk.

a.

Takes dictation

b.

Sits at a desk while working

c,

Works with unstructured tasks

d.

Ships and receives merchandise

e.

Operates telephone switchboard

X

f.

Uses the adding machine as a tool

X

g.

Performs tasks of small sequences

h.

Receives a period of paid vacation

X

Prepares reports at certain intervals

2.

j.

Works inside and o'thsiOe an office

k.

Works an average of 40 hours per week

1.

Records casb receipLs and payments in chronological order

Classify each of the following account titles by writing the word asset, liability, or capital in the right-hand column.

Classification

Account Title Johnson Supply Company (creditor)

Liability

Delivery Equipment

Asset

Cash

Asset

Wilson Equipment Company (c,-editor)

Liability

Truck

Asset

Lawn Equipment

Asset

2,7

33

Lesson 1

POSTTEST KEY (Continued) 2.

3.

(Continued)

Office Equipment

Asset

Pool Cleaning Equipment

Asset

Tom Lambert's Garage (creditor)

Liability

Jane Thompson, Capital

Capital

Furniture and Fixtures

Asset

Cleaning Supplies

Asset

Tom Fry, Capital

Capital

Office Supplies

Asset

Land

Asset

List the five steps used in preparing a balance sheet.

a.

Write the heading.

b.

Prepare the assets section.

c.

Prepare the liabilities section.

d.

Prepare the capital section.

e.

Balance and rule the balance sheet.

34

POSTTEST KEY (Continued)

4.

Lesson 1

Prepare a balance sheet for the Johnson Delivery Service dated May 1 of the current year. The following are the assets and the liabilities of the Johnson Delivery Service owned and operated by Fred Johnson.

Assets Cash Office Supplies Truck Office Equipment

$

635.10 112.40 2,250.00 400.00

$

214.00 860.00 160.50

Liabilities

Dallas Office Supply Company Auto Finance Company Bob Mack (creditor)

(211

..

/ /9-

29 35

LESSON Two

HOW TO RECORD THE OPENING ENTRY

PURPOSE

This lesson will identify the four steps used to record an opening entry. The learner will record an opening entry in the general journal.

PEFORMANCE OBJECTIVES The learner will list the four steps used in recording an opening entry. Given a beginning balance sheet and a general journal form, the learner will record an opening entry.

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Pr test

- 30 minutes - 90 minutes Posttest - 30 minutes

Le,ison

NEW VOCABULARY Journal

General journal

book of original entry

Opening entry

Entry

Source document

REPUISITE KNOWLEDGE

The learner will be required to know the basis for the classification of accounts as recorded in the begianing balance sheet. 31)

4

RESOURCES INCLUDED WITH LESSON Instructor's_ Packet

Pretest Key Posttest Key

_Learnerl-s Packet

Test Packet

Exercise Sheet Pretest

.Exercise and Worksheet Packet -Exercise Sheet

Posttest

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OR CONCERNS

The instructor will provide a copy of the general journal form (Teacher's Reference Guide, page F-8)

for the prees771715517=7----------

OVERVIEW

The opening entry contains information shown on the beginning balance sheet and is recorded in a permanent record book or journal. The procedures for recording the opening entry are: (1) write the date of the entry, (2) write the debit part of the entry, (3) write the credit part of the entry, and (4) write a brief description of the source document. The procedure for recording the opening entry will be the same procedure used to record all entries in the general journal. It is important thaE the learner understands the necessity of following each step for each entry. Skipping around and trying to list similar things, such as writing all of the account titles before writing the amounts, does not follow the discipline that needs to be established by the learner. This also leads to more errors.

LEARNER TASKS 1.

Read Chapter 2, pages 17 through 22 in Century 21 Accounting.

3831

2.

List the four steps used in recording the opening entry. The steps are illustrated ane explained on pages 19 through 21 in Century 21 Accounting. The learner may check his work with the text.

3.

Complete Problems 2-1 and 2-2 in Century 21 Accounting, pages 25 and 26.

4.

Check the problems using the working papers key.

SUPPLEMENTAL ACTIVITIES 1.

After the learner has read Chapter 2, pages 14 through 22 in Century 21 Accounting, a classroom lecture may be given with emphasis on the following points: a.

b. c. d. e.

The opening entry permanently records the beginning balance sheet. The journal is the book of original entry. Asset items on the balance sheet are recorded as debits in the journal. Liability and capital items on the balance. sheet are recorded as credits in the journal. The four steps for recording the opening entry are to Arite the date of the entry, the debits, the credits, and a brief description of the source or reason for the journal entry.

f.

These four steps are the same for recording all journal entries.

2.

The same bookkeeping filmstrip used in Lesson 1, The Opening Phase of Bookkeeping, may be shown and discussed.

3.

Additional activities for the accelerated learner include: a. b.

4.

Cases 1, 2, and 3, page 24 in Century 21 Accounting. Problem 2-13, pages 27 and 28 in Century 21 Accounting..

Additional tasks not included in the Learner's

32

39

Packet from Century 21 Accounting are:" a. b. c. d. e.

Study Guide 2 in the workbook Study Questions, page 12 Drill 2-D1, pages 24 and 25 Problem 2-ML pages 26 and 27 Problem 2-R1, page 699

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES No deviations from normal procedures

4033

LESSON Two

PRETEST KEY 1.

2.

List the four steps used in recording an opening entry. a.

Write the date of the entry.

b.

Write the debit part of the entry.

c.

Write the credit part of the entry.

d.

Write a brief description of the source document.

Record the opening entry from the following balance sheet in the general journal. Use May 1 of the current year as the date of the entry.

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PRETEST KEY (Cont

Le..ason 2

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Page

GENERAL JOORNAL

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Account Title

Date

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12

13

13

14

14

15

15

16

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17

17

18

1

13

19

20

20

21

21

22

22

23

23

24

24

25

25

26

26

27

27

28

28

29

211

.

30 31

.

30 31

32

32

33

33

34

34

35

35

36

36

37

37

42

LESSON Two POSTTEST KEY 1.

2.

List the four steps used in recording the opening entry in a general journal. a.

Write the date of the entry.

b.

Write the debit part of the entry.

c.

Write the credit part of the entry.

d.

Write a brief description of the source document.

Record the opening entry from the following balance sheet in the general journal. Use July 1 of the current year as the date of entry.

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:.esson 2

nued) POSTTEST KEY (Continued)

Pam

GENERAL JOURNAL

Account Title

Date

Credit

Debit

Ref

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44

LESSON THREE

HOW TO POST THE OPENING ENTRY

PURPOSE

The chart of accounts and ledger will be defined and their purposes explained to the learner in this lesson. The learner will also identify the five steps in posting the opening entry and follow these steps to post an opening entry.

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

The learner will define the ledger and explain its purpose. The learner will describe the function of the chart of accounts. The learner will list and sequence the five steps in posting an opening entry. Given an opening entry and forms for the general ledger, the learner will post the opening entry to the general ledger.

LESSON TIME

Pretest - 30 minutes Lesson - 90 minutes Posttest - 30 minutes

NEW VOCABULARY Business transaction

Debit side

Account

Debit or debit entry 45

078

Account title

Curt of accounts

Credit or vredit entry

Opening an account

Ledger

Account number

-Posting

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE

The learner will be required to know the classifications_of balance sheet accounts and the purpose of the opening entry.

RESOURCES INCLUDED WITH LESSON

Instructor's Packet

Pretest KeY

Learner's Packet

Test Packet

Pretest

Exercise Sheet

Exercise and Worksheet Packet None

Posttest

Posttest Key

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OR CONCERNS

Provide the learner with general ledger forms from the Teacher's Reference Guide, page F-14, for the pretest and posttest .

All posttests over the material coverea thus far must be taken before continuing the lessons.

OVERVIEW

Accounting records show the day-to-day financial changes in the operation of a business. These changes, as recorded in the journal, are sorted and summarized in the ledger.

46

A group of account$ LeferLd Lo a Ledger. The chart of accounts is a listing of the ledger account titles and their numbers.

The process of sorting and summarizing the transactions from the ledger is called posting. The five steps to be followed are: 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Write Write Write Write Write

the amount. the date of the transaction. the word Balance.

the post re6rence in the ledger. the post reference in the journal.

This lesson will conclude the study of the steps involved in starting an accounting' system.

LEARNER TASKS 1.

Read Chapter 3, pages 29 through 38 in Century 21 Accounting.

2.

Define the ledger and describe its purpose.

3.

Describe the function of the chart of accounts.

4.

Lis.. and sequence the five steps in posting an opening entry.

5.

Check the answers to taisks 2, 3, and 4 in the textbook Century 21 Accounting, pages 29 through 37.

6.

Complete problem 3-1, pages 41 and 42 in Century 21 Accounting. Also answer the questions listed in the self-checking section of the problem.

7.

Check the_problem,_using thc teacher's iaitiroin.

SUPPLEMENTAL ACTIVITIES 1.

After the learner has read the reference material in the textbook, Chapter 3, pages 29 through 38, Century 21 Accounting, a classroom

47

40

A

lecture may be given with emphasis on the following areas: a. b.

c. d. 2.

Chart of accounts Five steps in the procedure for posting to the ledger Nature of account balances Parts and purpose of the ledger

Additional exercises from Century 21 Accounting that the instructor may use for an accelerated learner are: a. b.

3.

Cases 1, 2, and 3, page 40 Bonus Problem 3-B, pages 43 and 44

Additional exercises relevant to the lesson from Century 21 Accounting that the instructor may use are: a. b. c. d. e. f.

4.

Study Questions, page 39 Study Guide 3 in workbook Drill 3-D1, page 40 Drill 3-D2, page 41 Mastery Problem 3-M, pages 42 and 43 Review Problems 3-R1, page 699

The filmstrip used in Lessons 1 and 2, Part 1, The Opening Phases of Bookkeeping may also be shown and discussed in this lesson.

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES

No deviation from normal procedures

48

THNt.

PRETEST KEY 1,

2.

Define the ledger and explain its purpose. a.

Definition:

b.

Purpose:

A ledger is a group of accounts.

The ledger organizes accounts in a systematic manner.

Explain the function of the chart of accounts. The chart of accounts serves as a table of contents for a general ledger. It is a listing of the account titles and their numbers.

3.

4.

List and sequence the five steps used in posting an opening entry. a.

Write the amount of the entry.

b.

Write the date of the entry.

c.

Write the word Balance.

d.

Write the post reference in the ledger.

e.

Write the post reference in the journal.

Post the following opening entry to the general ledger.

Page2.

GENERAL JOURNAL Post.

R9c)

Account Title

Date

Credit

Debit

T7-

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111

lo

PRETEST KEY

(Continued)

Lesson 3

Mary Western Real Estate Charts of Accounts

11) Assets Cash Office Supplies Furniture and Fixtures Automobile

Account Number 11 12 13 14

(2) Liabilities

John's Plumbing Co. Fisher Wholesale Furniture Co. Auto Loan Co.

Account Number 21 22 23

(3) Capital

Mary Western, Capital

43 50

31

PRETEST KEY

(Continued)

Lesson 3 GENERAL LEDGER

DATE

N.

ITEMS

ACCOUNT NO

, Poirr.

......................., DEBIT

DATE

I'M.

ITEMS

CREDIT

REF.

_

401.11171.1.

il

1

DATE

011:31111==

--

.

DATE

ACCOUNT NO... ITEMS

P°3T* I.

CREDIT

ilTSIMPFAIIIIMIIIIMMI mimimmi .1.

MB tl

ACCOUNT NO DATE

nirimir

Post.

DEBIT

Rxr.

DATE

Port.

ITEMS

REF.

f

/9

CREDIT

:

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DA DATE T

ITEMS

!

°sT i REF.

/,1 _.

CREDIT

zorISMIE

III

ll

1

NM

1111 I

PRETEST KEY

Lesson 3

(Continued)

GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNT NO

ITEMV

DATE

I POST. If

V DATE

DEBIT

REF. :I

14-EMS

POST.

4:1'2/

CREDIT

REF.

1

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fda,--14-e-e-.

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ACCOUNT NO

aZ.3

e4e5171(-74e2

ITEMS

DATE

I POST. REF.

DEBIT

ITEMS

DATE

POST.

CREDIT

REF.

/0,73600 ii

f

I

I

ACCOUNT NO 1.29/ DATE

,

ITEMS

DEBIT

E.

ITEMS

DATE

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CREDIT

THREE

LESS('

POSTTEST KEY 1.

2.

Define and explain the purpose of the ledger. a.

Definition:

b.

Purpose:

A ledger is a group of accounts.

There is a definite need for organization of accounts in a systematic manner.

Explain the function oT the chart of accounts. It serves as a table of contents for a general ledger. The chart of accounts is a listing of the account. :titles and their numbers.

3,.

4.

List and sequence the five steps used in posting an opening entry. a.

Write the amount.

b.

Write the date.

c.

Write the word Balance.

d.

Write the post reference in ledger.

e.

Write the post reference in journal.

Post the opening entry to the general ledger.

GENERAL JOURNAL Date 1

i

(2'

Post.

Account Title

Ref,

,

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2

If

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00

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9 10

POSTTEST KEY (Continued)

Lesson 3

James Russell Insurance Chart of Accounts

(1)

Assets

Cash Automobile Office Furniture Office Machines Office Supplies

Account Number 11 12 13 14 15

Account Number Liabilities 21 Thompson Furn. Co. 22 Public Utility Co. Auto Sales and Service 23 (2)

(3) Capital James Russell, Capital 31

54

4.7

At.Lnueci)

POSTTEST KEY

Lesson 3 GENERAL LEDGER

/1

ACCOUNT NO DATE

s

ITEMS

PosT. It REF.

DEBIT

111

DATE

ITEMS

DATE

ITEMS

POST.

CREDIT

POST.

CREDIT

REF', !i

91.5-,01

,11

DATE

ITEMS

POST.

REF.

f--

DEBIT

2 4)0,voir

ACCOUNT NO

..71614,7ti DATE

REF.

ITEMS

Er.

DEBIT

DATE

lTCMS

Pas*. REF

149

CREDIT

,9;)97 po

11,

t.

gr_ DATE

ITEMS

RellPos

et)

ACCOUNT NO.

'11a6/(4,*(.66. :1

DATE

ITEMS

REPOST,

/,4/

CREDIT

POSTTEST KEY

(Continued)

Lesson 3

GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNT NO DATE

t

ORM

ITEMS

.1,..

POST.

1%/ DEBIT

REF.

DATE

ITEMS

Post. REP'.

CREDIT

,, 4111.11.11.1.111.111.11111 OF

RI

ZIA4& Uet.(.1 & DATE

ITEMS

POSTAI REF.

DEBIT

Li .1

DATE

fq-

ACCOUNT NO ITEMS

+Pos. Rcr.r.

02

CREDIT

6azoo,

Aht-PCM...

rf Ri

ACCOUNT NO at2C3 DATE

ITEMS

Posy,

Rcr.S4

DEBIT

DATE

/51--

!I'

ITEMS

^ POST

Rer.

CREDIT

4

POSTTEST KEY

(C

InueJ)

Lesson 3

GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNT NO DATE

1

POST

ITEMS

DEBIT

REF.

POST.

ITEMS

DATE

13/

CREDIT

Flu,.

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... 1

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6-

.."agz?..,t..e.g.._

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ITEMS

DATE

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DEBIT

Rc. :1,

DATE

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ITEMS ,

CREDIT

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DATE

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DATE

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CREDIT

LESSON FOUR

HOW BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS AFFECT BALANCE SHEET ACCOUNTS

PURPOSE

In this lesson the learner will see how the beginning balances of assets, liabilities, and capital accounts are increased or decreased as a result of journal transactions.

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

Given a list of transactions pertaining to assets, liabilities, and/or capital accounts, the learner will indicate the classification of the accounts, the debit and credit parts of the transaction, and whether the account balances increased or decreased.

LESSON TIME

Pretest - 15 minutes - 120 minutes Lesson Posttest - 15 minutes

NEW VOCABULARY T account

Account balance

Debit balance

Credit balance

59

51

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE

The learner will need to know the classifications of balance sheet accounts, where the opening entry is posted in the ledger, and the accounting equation.

n

'S'

INCLUDED NCLUDED WITH LESSON

Instructor's Packet

Pretest Key

Learner's Packet

Test Packet

Learner Record Sheet 2

Posttest Key

Pretest

Worksheet Packet None

Posttest

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OR CONCERNS None

OVERVIEW

In this lesson business transactions are introThe transactions, duced for the first time. which concern balance sheet accounts, are broken down into their debit and credit parts. The effects of the transactions on the account balances are determined.

LEARNER'S TASKS 1.

Read Chapter 4, pages 45 through 52, in Century 21 Accounting (Accounting 10/12, pages 20 through 26 and 40 through 5I77

2.

Do Drills 4-D1, 4-D2, 4-D3, and 4-D4'on pages 54 through 56 in Century 21 Accounting (Accounting 10/12: Problems 14, 15, and 16,

'60

52

pages 25 and 26; problems 24 through 26, pages 44 and 45; problems 27 through 31, pages 49 through 51). 3.

Complete Problems 4-1 and 4-2, pages 57 and 58 in Century 21 Accounting.

4.

Check the drills and problems, using the teacher's edition of the working papers.

SUPPLEMENTAL ACTIVITIES 1.

After the learner has: read the assigned material in the textbook, a classroom lecture may be given with emphasis on the following points: a.

The balance of an asset account is usually a debit.

b. c.

d.

2.

The balance,of a liability and capital account is usually a credit. The balance side of an account is where increases are recorded and the opposite side is where decreases are recorded in the ledger. Business transactions are broken down into their debit and credit parts when journalized.

The instructor may assign the following tasks from Century 21 Accounting for the accelerated learner: a.

b. 3.

Cases 1 and 2, pages 53 and 54 Bonus Problem 4-B, page 60

The instructor may use the following tasks from Century 21 Accounting in conjunction with the lesson: a. b. c. d.

Study Questions, page 53 Study Guide 4 in workbook Master Problem 4-M, page 59 Review Problem 4-R1, page 700

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES

No deviation from normal procedures 61

53

LESSON FOUR

PRETEST KEY

Sara Johnson operates a real estate business. contains the following accounts: Cash Office Supplies Office Furniture Office Machines Library Automobile

Her ledger

Auto Sales and Repair (creditor) Public Utility Company (creditor) Office Supply and Equipment (creditor) Sara Johnson, Capital

Instructions: For each of the following problems, write the names of the accounts that are affected by the transaction and the classification of each account. Also, check the appropriate columns that indicate how the amount is recorded and how the account balance is changed. 1.

Purchased a reference book for the library.

2.

Purchased a new adding machine for the office.

Paid cash.

Paid

cash. 3.

Paid cash to Public Utility Company for amount owed.

4.

Received cash from sale of old adding machine.

5.

Paid cash to Office Supply and Equipment for amount owed.

/'

6.

Paid cash for order of personalized office stationery received today.

7.

Paid cash to Auto Sales and Repair in part payment of the amount owed.

8.

Received a personal check from Mrs. Johnson as an additional investment in the business.

63

54

Lesson 4

PRETEST KEY (Continued)

Name of Account

Problem Number

Account Classification

How is the Amount Recorded?

How is t] e Account alance Cha n ged? I

_

Debit Credit Increase Decrease l

1

2

Library

Asset

Cash

Asset

Office Machines

Asset

(Cash 3

4

5

Cash

Asset

Cash

Asset

Office Machines Office Supply and Equipment

Asset Liability

Cash

Asset

6

Office Supplies

Asset Asset

7

Cash Auto Sales and Repair

8

Liability

Cash

Asset

Cash Sara Johnson, Capital

Asset Capital

x

x x

x

Asset

Public Utility Co. Liability

x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

x

x

x

x x

x

x

x

LESSON FOUR POSTTEST KEY

Mr. Richard Williams operates an insurance agency. His ledger contains the following balance sheet accounts: Cash Automobile Office Supplies Office Machines Furniture and Fixtures

City Supply Company (creditor) Professional Answering Service (creditor)

Public Utility Company (creditor) Star Garage (creditor) Richard Williams, Capital

Instructions: For each of the following problems, write the names of the accounts that are affected by the transaction and the classification of each account. Also, check the appropriate columns that indicate how the amount is recorded and how the account balance is changed. 1.

Received $700 from Richard Williams, the owner, as an additional investment in the business

2.

Received $25 from sale of old typewriter

3.

Paid $300 for a new typewriter

4.

Paid $65 to Star Garage for repair of automobile

5.

Paid $35 to Public Utility Company

6.

Paid $40 for stationery supplies

7.

Paid $45 to Professional Answering Service for phone answering service

8.

Received $60 from sale of old office couch

9.

Paid $125 for new desk for office

65

56

Lesson 4

POSTTEST KEY (Continued)

Name of Account

Problem Number

1

2

3

4

Cash Richard Williams, Capital

6

8

9

Asset

Asset

Office Machines

Asset

Office Machines

Asset

Cash

Asset

Star Garage

How is the Amount Recorded?

How is the Account Balance Changed?

Debit Credit Increase Decrease x

Capital

Cash

Cash 5

Account Classification

Liability

x

x

x x

x x

x

Asset

Public Utility Co. Liability Cash

Asset

Office Supplies

Asset

Cash Professional Answering Service

Asset

x

Liability

Cash

Asset

Cash Furniture and Fixtures Furniture and Fixtures

Asset

Cash

Asset

x

x

x

Asset

x

Asset x

r 66

x

t

f

LESSON FIVE

HOW BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS AFFECT INCOME AND EXPENSE ACCOUNTS

PURPOSE

In this lesson two new classifications of accounts, income and expense, will be explained. The debit and credit parts of transactions pertaining to income and expense accounts will be determined and the effect of the transaction on the account balance will be described. The effect of the income and expense transactions on the capital account will also be discussed.

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

Given a list of transactions pertaining to income and expense accounts, the learner will classify the accounts, identify the debit and credit parts of the transactions, and determine the increase or decrease in the account balances.

LESSON TIME

Pretest - 15 minutes Lesson - 120 minutes Posttest - 15 minutes

NEW VOCABULARY'

Income

Expense

Profit

Loss

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE

The learner should know the three steps for analyzing business transactions, that an increase in capital is recorded as a credit, and that a decrease in capital is recorded as a debit.

RESOURCES INCLUDED WITH LESSON

Instructor's Packet Pretest Key

Learner's Packet

Test Packet

None

Pretest

Posttest Key

Exercise and Worksheet Packet None

Posttest

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OR CONCERNS None

OVERVIEW

Two new account classifications, income and expense, are introduced. The definitions of the words and their effects on the capital account are discussed. The learner will follow the three steps used in the previous lesson to analyze transactions that affect income and expense accounts and determine the increases or decreases in the account balances.

r:9 68

An overview of this lesson might begin with the statement, "Some learners will become confused." The illustration on page 67 in Century 21 Accounting should be thoroughly understood by the learner before he continues in the guide. The incorrect "reasoning" that you will be trying to straighten out may include one or both of the following philosophies: Assets, a debit, show what a person owns, and liabilities, a credit, show what a person owes. Income should have a debit balance because it makes me worth more, and expenses should have credit balances because they make me worth less. How can you "credit" income? The money that I owe a store for charged merchandise is a credit. When I charge more, I increase my credit at the store.

At the end of this lesson, the learner will be ready to begin recording transactions in the journal.

LEARNER TASKS

pages 61 through 67 in Century 21 Accounting (Accounting 10/12, pages 27 through 30 and pages 53 through 55).

1.

Read Chapter ..),

2.

Do Drills 5-D1, 5-D2, and 5-D3, pages 69 and 7( in Century 21 Accounting (Problems 17 through 19, pages 31 and 32; Problems 32 through 35, pages 55 through 58 in Accounting 10/12).

3.

Complete Problems 5-1 and 5-2 in Century 21 Accounting, pages 70 through 72.

4.

Check the drills and problems, using the teacher's edition.

SUPPLEMENTAL ACTIVITIES 1.

After the learners have read the appropriate material in the text (see Learner Task No. 1)

69

Co

,

a classroom lecture may be given with emphasis on the following points: a. b. c. 2.

Additional tasks for the accelerated learner that may be used with this lesson from Century 21 Accounting include the following problems: a.

b. 3.

Definition and purpose of income account Definition and purpose of expense account Analysis of income and expense transactions

Cases 1 through 4, pages 68 and 69 Bonus Problem 5-B, pages 73 and 74

Additional tasks from Century 21 Accounting that the instructor may use with the lesson include the following exercises and problems: a. b. c. d.

Study QuestionsL page 68 Study Guide 4 in workbook Mastery Problem 5-M, pages 72 and 73 Review Problem 5-R1, page 701

61 70

LESSON FIVE

PRETEST KEY

Alex Parkhill owns a real estate agency. contains the following accounts: Cash Office Supplies Office Machines Furniture and FixtureS Cummings Office Supply and Equipment (creditor) Johnson's Plumbing (creditor)

His ledger

Alex Parkhill, Capital Sales Commissions Income Advertising Expense Rent Expense Telephone Expense Utilities Expense

Instructions: For each of the following problems, write the names of the accounts that are affected by the transaction and the classification of each account. Also, check the appropriate columns that indicate how the amount is recorded and how the account balance is changed. 1.

Paid $175 cash for this month's rent

2.

Paid $24 cash for advertisement in local newspaper

3.

Received $400 cash for commission from sale of house

4.

Received $200 cash for commission from sale of property

5.

Paid $56 cash for telephone bill

6.

Paid $125 cash for new sign on office building

7.

Received $429 for commission from sale of apartment building

8.

Paid $35 cash for gas and electric bill

9.

Paid $7 cash for water bill

71

62

PRETEST KEY

Name of Account

Problem Number

1

2

Lesson 5

(Continued)

Rent expense

Account Classification Expense

How is the How is the Account Amount Recorded? Balance Changed? Debit Credit Increase Decrease x

x

Cash

Asset

x

x

Cash Advertisement Expense

Asset

x

x

Expense

x

x

Cash Sales Commission Income

Asset

x

x

Asset

5

Cash Sales Commission Income Telephone Expense

6

Cash Advertising Expense

3

4

Income

Expense

Expense

Asset Asset

8

Cash Sales Commission Income Utilities Expense

9

Cash Utilities Expense

'

Cash

x

x

x x

x x

x x

x

x

x x

x

Asset

72.

x

x

Asset Expense

x

x

Income

Expense

x x

x

Asset

x x

x

Income

Cash 7

x

x

C3

x

LESSON FIVE POSTTEST KEY Instructions: Refer to the T accounts shown below. For each problem, write the names of the accounts that are affected by the transaction and the classification of each account. Also, check the appropriate columns that indicate how the amount is recorded and how the account balance is changed. 1.

Cash

Office Machines

2.

40.00

200.00

150.00

Office Furniture

Sales Income

Cash

40.00

Cash

3.

200.00

1150.00

4. Rent Expense

Jay's Garage (credi-

5.

6. Telephone Expense

tor)

120.00

175.00

Cash

Cash

Cash

38.00

120.00

175.00

7.

38.00

-

Cash

Cash

8.

270.00

1000.00

Carolyn Reed, Capi-

Delive

tal 1000.00

9.

Public Utility Co. 47.00

1

Cash

Income

47.00

270.00

10. Office Furniture 85.00

Cash 85.00

POSTTEST KEY

(Continued)

Lesson 5

How is the Problem*

Name of Account

Number

1

Account Classifi'cation

Cash

Asset

Office Furniture

Asset

Office Machines

Asset

Cash

Asset

Cash

Asset

Sales Income

Income

Rent Expense

Expense

Cash

Asset

Jay's Garage

Liability

Cash

Asset

An1(

How is e Account

Recorded? Balance Changed? Debit Credit Increase Decrease,

.

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

x

Telephone Expense Expense Cash

Asset

Cash Carolyn Reed, Capital

Asset

Cash

Asset

Delivery Income Public Utility

Income

Coman

Liabilit

_Saab 10

x

Capital

x

x ,.

____

_LE

Office Furniture

Asset

Cash

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LESSON SIX

HOW TO RECORD BUSINESS TRANSACTIONS IN THE JOURNAL

PURPOSE

The learner will review accounting terms and apply the four steps involved in journalizing as they relate to the cash journal.

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

Given a list of accounting terms previously studied, the learner will define the terms. Given a list of cash transactions and a cash journal, the learner will perform the following functions: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5)

Analyzing the transaction Recording the transaction Proving cash Totaling the journal Ruling the journal

LESSON TIME

Pretest - 30 minutes - 120 minutes Lesson Posttest - 30 minutes

66 75

_

NEW VOCABULARY Journalizing

Memorandum entry

Special Journal

Footings

Cash Journal

Proving cash

Double-entry accounting

Single-entry accounting

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE

The learner will need to know the four steps for journalizing an accounting transaction, and the debit and credit parts of transactions involving assets, liabilities, capital, income aria/or expense accounts.

RESOURCES INCLUDED WITH LESSON Instructor's Packet

Pretest Key Posttest

Test Packet

Learner's Packet Vocabulary Review

Pretest

Kel Worksheet

Posttest

Exeibise and Worksheet Packet Vocabulary Review Worksheet

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OR CONCERNS Provide the learner with a copy of the cash journal (Teacher's Reference Guide, page F-l) for the pretest and posttest.

OVERVIEW

In this lesson the learner will record financial activities for a business in a cash journal. A short illustration of journalizing in the general

76

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journal is given first. Following thi^ the purpose of a special journal is explained, and the cash journal is defined and described.

The learner will become familiar with the memorandum entry. He will follow the four steps previously studied in Lesson 2 and record trail-if= actions in the cash ipurnal. The four steps are: write theClate,Write the debit, Wale the credit, and write the source or reason for the entry. The learner will find out how to prove cash, and he will foot, prove, and rule the cash journal.

LEARNER TASKS 1.

Read Chapter 6, pages 75 through 89 in Century 21 Accounting. (Accounting 10/12 contains no information on the five-column cash journal. Journalizing is discussed on pages 60 through 66. Appropriate problems are 36 through 38 on pages 65 through 67).

2.

Complete Vocabulary Review worksheet Ea-abiaing to the directions given.

3.

Do Drills 6-D1 and 6-D2, pages 91 and 92.

4.

Use the teacher's edition to check the drills.

5.

Complete Problems 6-1 and 6-2, pages 93 through 95. Special Note: The learner will need Problem 6-2 to complete Problem 7-1.

6.

Check the problems, using the teacher's edition.

SUPPLEMENTAL ACTIVITIES 1.

After the learner has read Chapter 6 in the textbook, a classroom lecture may be given with emphasis on the following points: a. b. c. d.

Reasons for journalizing transactions Advantages of using a cash journal Proving the accuracy of the cash journal Ruling the cash journal

77

2.

Additional tasks that may be used in the lesson with the accelerated learner are the following: a. b.

3.

Additional tasks that may be used in conjunction with the lesson are the following: a. b. c. d.

4.

Cases 1, 2, 3, and 4, pages 90 and 91 Bonus problem 6 -B, pagWS-97 and-911--

Study Questions, page 90 Study Guide 6 in workbook Mastery Problem 6-M, pages 95 through 97 Review Problem 6-R1, pages 701 and 702 in the textbook.

A bookkeeping filmstrip, Part II, The Recording Phase of Bookkeeping, Catalog No. B854, SouthWestern Publishing Company, may be shown and discussed in the classroom.

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES

No deviations from normal procedures

69 78

LESSON SIX PRETEST KEY 1.

Write the definitions for the following accounting terms.

CENTURY 21 ACCOUNTING Textbook Page

Teacher's Reference Guide

a.

Accounting equation

11

25

b.

Source document

18

27

c.

Double-entry accounting

76

34

d.

Liability

7

25

e.

Debit side

30

28

f.

Posting

32

29

g.

Income

61

32

h.

Capital

7

25

i.

Journal

17

27

J

Special journal

76

34

k.

Accounting

3

25

1.

Chart of accounts

31

28

m.

Memorandum entry

79

34

n.

Cash journal

76

34

PRETM KEY (Contin9r',!1

2.

Lesson 6

Christine Thompson owns and operates a real estate firm. Her ledger contains the following accounts: Cash Automobile Office Furniture Office Machines Office Supplies Frost Office Supply and Equipment (creditor) City Auto Finance Co. Christine Thompson, Capital a.

Commissions Income AdverLising Expense Automobile Expense Miscellaneous Expense Rent Expense Utility Expense

Record the following transactions on page 8 of a five-column cash journal. Use the current year when journalizing the transactions: Number all receipts beginning with.76. All payments were made by check. Numberall checks beginning with 3025. The cash isalance on February 1 was $542.

Feb. 1

cash, $200, for rent of office for V:=J:Tuary

Paid cash, $20, for advertising in news5

Sold old office desk; received cash, $70

5

Received cash, $200, as commission from renting a house

5

Received cash, $750, as commission from s'=.11ing a house

6

Paid cash, $325, for new office desk

6

Paid cash, $100, for new office chair

7

Paid cash, $112, to City Auto Finance Company for amount owed

9

Received cash, $168, as commission for nnitinq a house

16

Paid cash, $14, for oil change and gas for automobile 1-a

80

.44.

PRETEST KEY (Continued)

Lesson 6

16

Paid cash, $67, for amount owed to Frost Office Supply and Equipment

23

Paid cash, $16, for renewal of magazine subscriptions for office

26

Received cash, $350, as commission from sale of land

28

Paid cash, $65, for utility bill for February

28

Received from Christine Thompson, the proprietor, $500, as an additional investment in the business

b.

Foot the journal.

c.

Prove cash. was $1661.

d.

Total and rule the journal.

The checkbook balance February 28

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POSTTEST KEY 1.

Write the definitions for the following accounting terms.

CENTURY 21 ACCOUNTING Textbook Page a.

Balance sheet

b.

Teacher's Reference Guide

6

25

Journalizing

75

34

c.

Footings

87

34

d.

Creditor

7

25

e.

Credit side

30

28

f.

Account balance

45

30

g.

Expense

64

32

h.

Proprietor

7

25

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17

27

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76

34

7

25

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32

29

m.

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29

28

n.

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88

34

Lesson 6

POSTTEST KEY (Continued)

2.

Frank Taylor owns and operates a barber shop. ledger contains the following accounLs: Cash Shop Supplies Shop Equipment Wilson Linen Supply (creditor)

Thompson Uniform Co.

His

Income Advertising Expense Miscellaneous Expense Rent Expense Wages Expense Utilities Expense

(creditor)

Frank Taylor, Capital a.

Record the following transactions on page 4 of a five-column cash journal. Use the current year when journalizing the transactions. Number all receipts beginning with 175. All payments were made by check. Number all checks beginning with 1450. The cash balance on March 1 was $736.

March

2

Paid cash, $675, for weekly wages

2

Received and deposited cash, $1250, for income from the week

5

Paid cash, $400, for monthly rent

6

Paid cash to Thompson Uniform Co., $52, for monthly smock rental

6

Paid cash to Wilson Linen Co., $164, for monthly linen service

8

Paid cash, $17, for magazine subscriptions

9

Paid cash, $675, for weekly wages

9

Received and deposited cash, $1200, for income from the week

12

Paid cash, $200, for new equiimient

84

Lesson 6

POSTTEST KEY (Continued)

14

Bought supplies and paid cash, $553

15

Paid cash, $4, for newspaper for month

16

Paid cash, $675, for weekly wages

16

Received and deposited cash, $1,234, for income from the week

23

Paid cash, $675, for weekly wager

23

Received and deposited cash, $9624 for income for the week

26

Paid cash, $28, for advertising in newspaper

30

Paid cash, $675, for weekly wages

30

Paid cash, $96, for utilities for March

30

Received and deposited cash, $1208, for income from the week

b.

Foot each of the column totals in the cash journal. Prove the equality of debits and credits.

c.

Prove cash.

d.

Total and rule the journal.

The cash balance on March 31 was $1701.

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LESSON SEVEN

HOW TO POST JOURNAL ENTRIES TO THE LEDGER

PURPOSE

The four steps of posting from the cash journal to the ledger will be explained, and the learner will be required to post a cash journal that has been totaled and ruled.

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

The learner will list the four steps in posting from a cash journal. Given a totaled and ruled cash journal, the learner will post the amounts to the general ledger.

LESSON TIME Pretest Lesson Posttest -

20 minutes 110 minutes 20 minutes

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE

The learner will be required to understand journalizing in the cash journal and to recall the five steps used in posting to the ledger.

RESOURCES INCLUDED WITH LESSON

Test Packet

Learner's Packet

Instructor's Packet

Exercise Sheet

Pretest Key

Posttest Kel Exercise Sheet Key

Pretest

Exercise and Worksheet Packet Exercise Sheet

Posttest

.

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OR CONCERNS

The learner will need the cash journal completed in Lesson 6, Problem 6-2, to do Problem 7-1. At the conclusion of this lesson, all tests over the material in Lessons 4 through 7 must be taken and the objectives signed before the learner may proceed to Lesson 8.

OVERVIEW In this lesson the learner will follow the following four steps to post individual amounts and special columns from the cash journal to the ledger. 1. 2. 3.

4.

Write Write Write Write

the the the the

amount. date. post reference in the ledger. post reference in the journal.

The purpose of posting will also be discussed. The purpose of posting is to sort journal transactions into the different ledger accounts where the information may be summarized and reported.

LEARNER TASKS 1.

Read Chapter 7, pages 99 through 112 in the Century 21 Accounting textbook. (Although

88

Accounting 10/12 does not use the five column cash journal, appropriate reading material regarding posting may be found on pages 67 through 73. Tasks for reading assignment are problems 40 and 41 on page 75.) 2.

List the four steps of posting from a cash journal on the exercise sheet provided in the lesson.

3.

Check the answers, using the exercise sheet key.

4.

Complete Drills 7-D1, 7-D2, and 7-D3 on pages 114 and 115 in the textbook.

5.

Do Problem 7-1 on page 115 in the textbook.

6.

Check the drills and problems, using the teacher's edition.

SUPPLEMENTAL ACTIVITIES 1.

After the learners have read the material in Chapter 7 of the textbook, the instructor may present a classroom lecture. The following points should be emphasized by the instructor. a. b. c.

2..

Additional problems from the Century 21 Accounting textbook for the accelerated learner that may be used with this lesson include the following exercises. a. b.

, 3.

3.

Steps in posting individual journal entries Steps in posting columnar totals from the journal Purpose of posting

Cases 1, 2, and 3 on page 113 Bonus Problem 7-B on pages 117 and 118

Additional materials that may be used with this lesson from the textbook and working papers are: a. b. c. d.

Study Questions page 113 Study Guide 7 in workbook Mastery Problem 7-M, pages 115 through 117 Review Problem 7-R1, pages 703 and 704

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES

No deviation from normal procedures _ A9n

LESSON SEVEN

PRETEST KEY 1.

List the four steps used in posting from 'a cash journal.

2.

a.

Write the amount of the entry in the ledger.

b.

Write the date of the entry in the ledger.

c.

Write the post reference in the ledger.

d.

Write the post reference in the journal.

The cash journal for the Thomas Phillips Realty Agency appears on the following page. The ledger for the agency is also given. Instructions: a.

Post the individual amounts in the general debit and general credit columns to the accounts in the ledger.

b.

Post the totals of the three special columns of the cash journal to the proper accounts in the ledger.

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LESSON SEVEN POSTTEST KEY 1.

List the four steps used in posting ftom a-Uash journal.

2.

a.

Write the amount of the entry in the ledger.

b.

Write the date of the entry in the ledger.

c.

Write the post reference in the ledger.

d.

Write the post reference in the journal.

The cash journal for Dr. Peter Franklin appears on the following page. The ledger is also given. Instructions: a.

Post the individual amounts in the general debit and general credit columns to the accounts in the ledger.

b.

Post the totals of the three special columns of the cash journal to the proper accounts in the ledger. ti

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DATE

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DATE

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r POST. r REF.

-111

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101

91

CREDIT

POSTTEST KEY

Lesson 7

(Cvntinuad)

GENERAL LEDGER

---

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_

DATE

ue.r.

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1

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11

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7

DATE

I

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000 leitk i

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REF.

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,

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LESSON EIGHT A

HOW TO PROVE THE ACCURACY OF POSTING

PURPOSE

In this lesson the learner will become familiar with the function of a trial balance and the five steps that are used to prepare a trial balance. He will learn the seven steps for locating errors when the trial balance does not balance. The learner will also prepare a trial balance.

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

The learner will identify a function of the trial balance. The learner will list the five steps in preparing a trial balance. The learner will describe the seven stepby-step procedures fori6cating'errors When a trial balance does not balance.

Given a trial balance form and the ledger account titles with their balances, the learner will prepare a trial, balance. 41,....1.1,1IIA*6110.,........

...e.Cini.wrarnoMeNIV

LESSON TIME

Pretest - 20 minutes Lesson - 110 minutes Posttest - 20 minutes

103

93

NEW VOCABULARY Trial balance

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE The learner will need to know the purpose of the ledger and the steps of posting from the journal to the ledger.

RESOURCES INCLUDED WITH LESSON

Instructor' Packet

Pretest Key

Test Packet

Learner's Packet

Exercise Sheet

Posttest Key Exercise Sheet Key

Exercise and Worksheet Packet

Pretest Posttest

Trial Balance Worksheet

Exercise Sheet

Trial Balance Worksheet

Trial Balance Worksheet Key Learner Record Sheet 3

ACTIViTIES OR CONCERNS

SPEC!A

None

OVEVIE:4 the Th e. function of the trial balance is to prove

equality of the debits and credits

104)1

The five steps

that are u:ed in 1. 2. 3. 4.

5.

:inft: are:

Write the heading. Last the'accounts in the ledger and their balances.. c Rule the columns with a single line. Add the columns and compare the totals. If the totals are the same, write the amount. Rule the columns wif11 a double line.

If the debit and credit columns of a trail balance do not agree, there are seven steps that are followed to locate the errors in the trail balance. These steps are: 1. 2.

3.

4.

Re-add the columns of the trial balance. Find the difference between the column totals. Check for this number in the ledger and journals. Divide the difference between the column totals by two. Check to see if this number was written on the wrong side of the ledger account or trial balance. Divide the difference between the totals of the columns by nine. If the difference is evenly divisible by nine, look for transpc-7ed nthabers in the ledger and journal. Also look for numbers where the decimal point: has been incorrectly placed.

5.

6. 7.

Compare the ledger account balances with the balances written on the trial balance to see if they are the same. Verify the account balances in the ledger and the footings. Verify the posting of each entry or column total in the jcurual.

Preparation of the trial balance is the first part of the third step in the accounting cycle. In the next lesson the learner will see how the trial balance is used to complete a six-column work sheet.

LEARNER TASKS 1.

Read Chapter 8 on pages 119 through 129 in

Centua 21 Accounting (Accountingly12, pages 78 through 85).

105

2. 3.

4.

Identify a function of the trial balance. Write the response on the exercise sheet. List on the exercise sheet the five steps in preparing a trial balance. Describe the seven step-by-step procedures for locating errors when a trial balance does not balance. Write the response on the exercise sheet.

5.

6.

Check the answers to Tasks 2, 3, and 4, using the exercise sheet key. Complete the Trial Balance worksheet according to the directions given. Check the worksheet using the Trial BalanCe worksheet key. Do Drills 8 -Di and 8-D2 on pages 130 and 131 in .

7. 8.

Cenllua21AccountLI. 9.

10.

Complete Problems 8-1 and 8-2 on page 132 in Century 21 Accounting (Accounting 10/12, Problems 43 through 46, page 86). Check the drills and problems, using the teacher's edition of the workbook.

SUPPLEMENIAL ACTIVITIES 1.

Aftcx the 1:,..J1r-ils,4 K,,w4 read the mrtterial in the

T.Sk 1) a classroom lecstx,ea Yith -Irophasis cm the following ,

tvle ray h

a. b. c.

to loot 3nd totz-11 tho leagar accounts 1.Tc41 to p..epave a trial balance I4ew to errors when a trial balance

doeo

150.aftce

' :or talc; lesson that may be

2.

acce3srd learner include the C:7:rktlzry21 Accountinv Caz.,.; 1, 2, 3.

lAdJ:Ijion:=51

:'.:1(T1

3, on page 130.

for this lesson includes the n',!, from C,Dtury 21 Accounti42: p....jo 129 in textbook

.

c.

Pr,r)lzc.t.

t, pag.?s L33 through 136 (This is a s(.; far.)

d.

Review Problems 8-R1 and 8-R2 on pages 704 and 705.

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES

No deviation from normal procedures

LESSON EIGHT PRETEST KEY 1.

Circle the correct response to the following question:

Which one of the following describes the function of the trial balance? a. b.

c.

Summarizes the financial condition of a business Reports the income, expenses, and net income or loss for a business Shows how the cash balance of a business agrees with the bank balance

0 Proves the equality of the debits and credits in the ledger 2.

3.

List the five steps in preparing a trial balance. a.

Write the heading for the trial balance.

b.

List the accounts in the ledger and their balances.

c.

Rule the columns with a single line.

d.

Add the columns and compare the totals. totals are the same, write the amounts.

e.

Rule the columns with a double line.

If the

Describe the seven step-by-step procedures for locating errors when a trial balance does not balance. a.

Re-add the columns to check the totals.

b.

Find the difference between the totals of the debit and credit columns. Check for this number in the ledger and journal.

c.

Divide the difference between the totals of the columns by two. Check to see if this number was wrii;tsn on thJ wrong :ids of the ledger account or trial balance.

Lesson 8

PRETEST KEY (Continu,A) d.

Divide the difference between the totals of the columns by nine. If the difference is evenly divisible by nine, look for transposed numbers ($43.00 instead of $34.00) in the ledger and journal. Also look for numbers where the decimal point has been incorrectly placed ($76.00 instead of $7.60).

e.

Compare the ledger account balances with the balances written on the trial balance to see if they are the same.

f.

Verify the account balances in the ledger and footings.

g.

4.

Verify the posting of each entry or column total in the journal.

The ledger accounts for WalLer Jackson's Insurance Agency are given below. Instructions: a. b.

c.

Foot the ledger accounts. Prove the cash account. The bank balance according to the checkbook on June 30 is $3094. There are no outstanding checks or deposits. Prepare a trial balance dated June 30 of the current year. Cash proof: Debit footings: Credit footings: Balance in ledger account:

Balance in checkbook

a9

110

$4502.00 1408.00 T3094.00

$3094.00

PRE TEST KEY

Lesson 8

(Con unued)

GEN UAL, LaDe ER ACCOUNT NO aMmolowln-00.2111VilinneFen1110.rMolamOrtiVeaa,.-6.1.eamne.y.

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PRETEST KEY

Lesson 8

(Continued)

GENERAL LEDGER ACCOUNT NO ITEMS

DATE

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PRETEST KEY

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LESSON EIGHT POSTTEST KEY 1.

Circle the correct response to the following questions:

Which one of the following desoilbes the function of the trial balance? a.

(b) c.

d. 2.

3.

Lists creditors' accounts and balances owed by the business Proves the equality of the debits and credits in the ledger Reports the charges to a customers' account, the payments by the customer, and the amount due the business Shows the balances of the balance sheet accounts

List the five steps in preparing a trial balance. a.

Write the heading for the trial balance.

b.

List the accounts in the ledger and their balances.

c.

Rule the columns with a single line.

d.

Add the columns and compare the totals. totals are the same, write the amounts.

e.

Rule the columns with a double line.

If the

Describe the seven step-by-step procedures for locating errors when a trial balance does not balance. a.

Readd the columns to check the totals.

b.

Find the difference between the totals of the debit and credit columns. Check for this number in the ledger and journal.

c.

Divide the difference between the totals of the columns by two, Check to see if this number was written on the wrong side of the ledger account or trial balance. 117

105

POSTTEST KEY (Continued)

4.

Lesson 8

d.

Divide the difference between the totals of the columns by nine. If the difference is evenly divisible by nine, look for transposed numbers in the ledger and journal. Also'look for numbers where the decimal point has been incorrectly placed.

e.

Compare the ledger account balances with the balances written on trial balance to see if they are the same.

f.

Verify the account balances in the ledger and the footings.

g.

Verify the posting of each entry or column total in the journal.

The ledger accounts for Thompson's Lawn Service are given below. Instructions: a. h.

c.

Foot the ledger accounts. Prove the cash account. The bank balance according to the checkbook on June 29 is $1033. There are no outstanding checks or deposits. Prepare a trial balance dated June 29 of the current year.

Cash proof: Debit footings: Credit footings: Balance in ledger account:

Balance in checkbook

$3667.00 2634.00 $1033.00 $1033.00

POSTTEST KEY

Lesson 8

((oolinucad)

GENERALLEOGER

7-7

ACCOUNT NO

(tzfU

DATE ATE

P00%

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,

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ITEMS

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/

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DATE

1

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A.444&ow.. .111MANI.1.1.1111.1MRI...

NO..211

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DATE

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POSTTEST KEY

Lesson 8

(Continued)

--..

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DATE

POST.

ITEMS

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REF.

DATE

IMO

Ft*...mm ITEMS

DATE

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;

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DATE

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REF.

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L / to

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ACCOUNT NO,

!

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....

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x-reae-mmwm weeNamaaMppreas.oswoommos..

DEBIT k

POST. REF'.

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.,------

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POSTTEST KEY

Lesson 8

(CoDtAnued)

GENERAL. LEDGER

ACCOUNT NO 51

deti-o-nz.4,44:6) 1

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os.r. ITEN47'.-.."--7--7----- I Rcr

DATE

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DATE

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.. -150 I1

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3' 0 o i .27 0 0

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ACCOUNT NO.

$

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I 1

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DATE

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Lesson 8

(Continued) NiLewl-p414-rt:o

leA4At.eit.)

4(..O ad .141.10c-ft.te,,

19 /9

(

j?0000 iz6roo

12i co

LESSON NINE

HOW TO PREPARE A SIX-COLUMN WORK SHEET,

AN INCOME STATEMENT, AND A BALANCE SHEET

PURPOSE

In this lesson the learner will study the function of the six-column work sheet. He will also be introduced to the balance sheet and income statement that are prepared from the work sheet.

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES

The learner will (1) list a function of the work sheet, (2) list three major sections of the debit and credit columns of the work sheet, and (3) describe a function of 6,acll oajor debit and credit section of the work sheet. The learner will describe one function of the income statement and one function of the balance sheet.

LESSON TIME Pretest 15 minutes Lesson - 150 minutes Posttest - 15 minutes

123

01

NEW VOCABULARY Work sheet

Net income

Fiscal period

Net loss

Fiscal year

Income statement

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE

The learner will need to know the purpose of the trial balance and how to prepare it.

RESOURCES INCLUDED WITH LESSON

Instructor's Packet

Pretest Key

Learner's Packet

Test Packet

Exercise Sheet

Posttest Key Exercise Sheet Key

Pretest

Exercise and Worksheet Packet Exercise Sheet

Posttest

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OR CONCERNS None

OVERVIEW

The work sheet is an alalysis paper where the financial condition of a business can be summarized. It is used in the preparation of the income statement and the balance sheet.

124 102

The major sections and their functions are: 1,

Trial balance - proves the equality of the debits and credits in the general ledger.

2.

Income statement - shows the balances of the income and expense accounts. The difference between the debits and the credits is the profit or loss of a business.

3.

Balance sheet shows the balances of the asset, liability, and capital accounts. The difference between the debits and the credits represents the change in the capital account, i.e., the profit or loss of a business.

In most instances, the first year accounting clerk will not be asked to complete work sheets or to prepare financial statements for the employer. However, a knowledge of these two parts of the accounting cycle is important because it answers the first year learner's questions, "Why do I record this transactinn the way I do?" and "Why must my records be accurate?"

LEARNER TASKS I.

Read Chapter 9, pages 137 through 142 in Century (The Accounting 10/12 textbook 21 Accounting. does not feature information on the six-column work sheet.)

2.

List a function of a work sheet and the three major sections of the debit and credit columns of the work sheet. Debcribe a function of each major debit and cxcdit section of the work sheet. Write the answers on the exercise sheet.

3,

Check the answers to the exercise with the exercise sheet key.

4.

Complete Drills 9-D1 and 9-D2 on pages 143 and 144 in Century 21 Accounting.

125

j03

5.

Use the teacher's edition to check the drills.

6.

Read Chapter 10, pages 147 through 153 in Century 21 Accounting (Accounting 10/12, pages 33 through 36. Also read pages 87through 92.)

.7.

Describe one function of the income statement and one function of the balance sheet on the exercise sheet.

8.

Check Task 7, using the exercise sheet key.

9.

Complete Drills 10-D1 and 10-D2 on pages 154 and 155 in Century 21 Accounting (Accounting 10/12, Problem 20, page 36 and Problem 47, pages 92 and 93).

10.

Check the answers to the drills, using the Teacher's Edition of the Working Papers and Study Guides.

SUPPLEMENTAL ACTIVITIES 1.

Prepare a work sheet in class, using an overhead projector. Explain the function of the work sheet, the three major sections, and a function of each major debit and credit section of the work sheet.

2.

Using an overhead projector and the worksheet prepared in Step 1, prepare an income statement and Explain the function of each rebalance sheet. port.

3.

The additional tasks for this lesson may be divided into three categories. They are (a) those suggested but not required to successfully complete the performance objectives, (b) those recommended for use with the accelerated learner, and (c) supplemental tasks for use with the lesson. a.

Suggested tasks (1)

Problem 9-1, pages 144 and 145 in Century 21 Accounting

C 126

r f

(2)

Problem 10-1 and 10-2, pages 156 and l5'7 in Century_21 Accounting (Accounting 10/12, Problems 48 through 52, pages 93 and 94).

b.

Tasks for the accelerated learner: (1) (2) (3) (4)

c.

Cases 1, 2, and 3, pages 142F and 143 in Century 21 Accounting Bonus Problem 9-B, page 146 in Century 21 Accounting Cases 1 and 2, page 154 in Century 21 Accounting Bonus Problem 10-B, page 158 in Century 21 Accounting

Supplemental tasks from Century 21 Accounting: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6) (7) (8)

Study Questions, page 142F Study Guide 9 in workbook Mastery Problem 9-M, pages 145 and 146 Review Problem 9-R1, page 705 Study Questions, page 154 Study Guide 10 in workbook Mastery Problem 10-M, page 157 Review Problem 10-R1, page 706

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES

No deviation from normal procedures

127

i05

LESSON NINE PRETEST KEY 1.

Instructions:

Complete the following: a.

List a function of a work sheet. The work sheet is an analysis -or working paper on which the financial condition of a business can be summarized. It is used in the preparation of other reports.

b.

c.

2.

List three major sections of the debit and credit columns of the work sheet. (1)

Trial balance

(2)

Income statement

(3)

Balance sheet

Describe a function of each major debit and credit section of the work sheet. (1)

The trial balance proves the equality of the debits and credits in the ledger.

(2)

The income statement shows the balances of the income and expense accounts and the profit or loss of a business.

(3)

The balance sheet shows the balances of the asset, liability, and capital accounts. The difference between the totals of the debit and credit columns represents the profit or loss of a business and the change in the capital account.

Instructions:

Describe one function of the income statement and one function of the balance sheet. a.

Income Statement - any one of the following responses is correct.

129

1,C6

PRETEST KEY (Continued)

(1) (2)

(3)

b.

The income statement shows the balance of the income and expense accounts. The income statement shows the profit or loss of a business over a period of time It supplies management with answers to questions such as: Is income increasing or decreasing? Are expenses too large?

Balance Sheet (1)

(2)

Lesson 9

any one of the following responses is correct.

The balance sheet shows the balances of the asset, liability, and capital accounts. It provides information to granters of credit, such as banks, about the financial condition of the business.

130

stf-s-7

LESSON NINE

POSTTEST KEY 1.

Instructions:

Complete the following: a.

List a function of a work sheet.

The work sheet is an analysis or working paper on which the financial condition of a business can be summarized. It is used in the preparation of the other reports. b.

c.

2.

List three major sections of the debit and credit columns of the work sheet. (1)

Trial balance

(2)

Income statement

(3)

Balance sheet

Describe a function of each major debit and credit section of the work sheet. (1)

The trial balance proves the equality of the debits and credits in the ledger.

(2)

The income statement shows the balances of the income and expense accounts and the profit or loss of a business.

(3)

The balance sheet shows the balances of the asset, liability, and capital accounts. The difference between the totals of the debit and credit columns represents the profit or loss of a business and the change in the capital account.

Instructions:

Describe one function of the income statement and one function of the balance sheet. a.

Income Statement - any one of the following responses is correct.

POSTTEST KEY (Continued)

(1) (2) (3)

b.

Lesson 9

The income statement shows the balance of the income and expense accounts. The income statement shows the profit or loss of a business over a period of time. It supplies management with answers to questions such as: Is income increasing or decreasing? Are expenses too large?

Balance Sheet - any one of the following responses is correct. (1) (2)

Ole balance sheet shows the balances of the asset, liability, and capital accounts. It provides information to granters of credit, such as banks, about the financial condition of the business.

132 1

9

LESSON TEN

HOW TO CLOSE THE LEDGER

PURPOSE

The final two steps of the accounting cycle will be examined in this lesson. These steps are to close, rule, and balance the ledger accounts and to-kepare a post - closing trial balance.

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIVES The learner will list two needs for closing entries.

The learner will list a function of the post-closing trial balance. The learner will list the six steps in the accounting cycle.

LESSON TIME

Pretest - 10 minutes - 100 minutes Lesson 10 minutes Posttest

NEW VOCABULARY Accounting cycle

Closing the ledger

Closing entry

Post-closing trial balance

110133

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE

The learner will need to know the basis for the classifications of accounts in the ledger, such as balance sheet accounts or temporary capital accounts. He will also need to recall the function of a trial balance.

RESOURCES INCLUDED WITH LESSON Instructor' Packet

Learner's Packet

Pretest Key

Exercise Sheet

Test Packet

Pretest

Posttest Key Exercise Sheet Key

Exercise and Worksheet Packet Exercise Sheet

Posttest

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OR CONCERNS None

OVERVIEW

The emphasis in this lesson should be placed on the learner knowing about the "why" of closing the ledger rather than knowing how to record closing entries and how to prepare a post-closing trial balance. The responses to the performance objectives state that the closing entries clear the income and expense accounts and bring the owner's capital account up-to-date. This nay be done monthly, quarterly, semiannually, or annually. It is done so that a proprietor may prepare income tax reports, compare operating costs with budgeted expenses, determine the net income or loss, and forecast business activities. The entire accounting cycle is also reviewed in this lesson.

134

1,x1

r

LEARNER TASKS 1.

Read Chapter 11, pages 159 through 173 in Century 21 Accountina (Accounting 10/12, pages 97 through 111).

2.

List two needs for closing entries on the exercise sheet. Check the answers, using the exercise sheet key.

3.

Do Drill 11-D1, page 175 and 176 in Century 21 Accounting (Accounting 10/12, Problem 53 and 54, pages 102 and 103). Check the answers, using the teaCheVA_Adition.

4.

List a function of the post-closing trial balance on the exercise sheet. Use the exercise sheet key to check the answers.

5.

Do Drill 11-D2, page 176 in Century 21 Accounting. Check, the drill, using the teacher's edition (Accounting 10/12, Problem 57, pages 110 and 111).

6.

List the six steps in the accounting cycle on the exercise sheet. Check the answers, using the exercise sheet key.

SUPPLEMENTAL ACTIVITIES 1.

.

Although the following exercises are not required to successfully complete the performance objectives, they are recommended fez ugt in the unit. Problem 11-1 and 11-3, pages 176 through 178 in Century 21 Accounting (Problems 55 and 56, pages 103 and 104 in Accounting 10/12) .

2.

Additional exercises that may be used with this lesson for the accelerated learner are Cases 1 through 4 on pages 174 and 175 in Century 21 Accounting.

135

112

3.

Additional tasks that may be used with this lesson from Century 21 Accounting are: a. b. c.

d. e.

4.

Study Questions, Chapter 11, page 174 Study Guide 11 in worksheet Problem 11-2, page 177 Project 2, page 179 through 183 Review Problems 11-R1 and 11-R2, pages 706 and 707

A filmstrip, The Closing Phase of Bookkeeping, Catalog No. B854, South-Western Publishing Company, may be shown and discussed.

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES

No deviations from normal procedures

1 -.!..

3

136

LESSON TEN

PRETEST KEY 1.

List two needs for closing entries. a. b.

2.

To clear the income and expense accounts To bring the owner's capital account up to date

List a function of the post-closing trial balance.

To prove the equality of the debits and credits in the general ledger 3.

List the six steps in the accounting cycle.

Record transactions in journal. Prepare a postclosing 6.

Post journal entries 2. to the ledger.

trial

balance.

Close, rule, and balance ledger accounts.

Prepare financial statements from work sheet.

137

114

LESSON TEN

POSTTEST KEY 1.

List two needs for closing entries. a.

b.

2.

To clear the income and expense accounts To bring the owner's capital account up to date

List a function of the post-closing trial balance.

To prove the equality of the debits and credits in the general ledger 3.

List the six steps in the accounting cycle.

1.

Record transactions in journal. Prepare a postclosing

116

Post journal entries to the ledger.

trial balance.

Close, rule, and balance ledger 5. accounts.

Prepare a work sheet. Prepare financial statements from work sheet.

4.

139

115

2.

ELEVEN

SELF EVALUATION

PURPOSE

In this lesson the lean-v..1s will evaluate himself in regard to the accounting clerk profession based upon his background, success on the performance objectives, areas where improvement is needed, and personal preference.

PERFORMANCE OBJECTIV

After completing a study of the accounting cycle, the learner will describe four of his personal strengths and an area for improvemenc in z,lation to the accounting clerk Profession. He /she will also evali4ate the professi-,n as a possible career choice based upon his/,ler performance in the lessons and personal px,21Erehce. I

LESSON TIME

Pretest - 20 minutes Lesson - 20 minutes Posttest 2C mirute

PREREQUISITE KNOWLEDGE

The learner should recall the specifications and requirements for the profession accounting clerk, as described in the Job and Skill Description worksheet, and be familiar with his success in completing the performance objectives in the preceeding lessons.

14116

RESOUUCES INCLUDED WITH LESSON Instructor's Packet

Test Packet

Learner's Packet

Exercise and orksheet Packet .

Pretest

'Key

Self-Evaluation Worksheet

Posttest Key Self- Evaluation Worksheet Key

Pretest Posttest

elf-Evaluation orkiheet pb and Skill Description t Worksheet

Job and Skill Description Worksheet

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES OR CONCERNS

Titles and A copy of the Dictionary of Occupational should be available the Occupational Outlook Handbook the learner for the learner's use. The instructor and should also have their records (Learner Record Sheets and Instructor Record Sheets) on hand. Sheet 3 All performance objectives on Learner Record begin Lesson 12. before the learner may must be signed

OVERVIEW in the basic The learner has completed instruction with_ the accounting cycle. Before he continues lessons he is required to evaluate himself in relaThis will be the tion to the course and profession. purpose of the pretest and posttest. evaluation It is very important that the learner's the instruc(pretest or posttest) be discussed with encourage the learner tor. At that time, you may review assignto continue with the lessons, suggest continues before the learner ments in weak areas into another with the lessons, or channel the learner career cluster.

142

1

If the learner has been very successful in the lessons, he may agree to a course of study directed toward a higher level of learning. The assignments for the accelerated learner would be used to achieve this goal.'

LEARNER TASKS 1.

Reread the worksheet Job and Skill Description.

2.

Review your performance on the objectives in the lessons.

3.

Complete the worksheet Self-Evaluation.

4.

Review the worksheet Self-Evaluation, using the worksheet key.

SUPPLEMENTAL ACTIVITIES 1.

A guest speaker from the field of accounting may be asked to address the class and answer questions concerning one or more of the following topics: a.

Fields of accounting such aq cost accounting, incnme tax accounting, and auditing

b.

Local employment opportunities for the learner

c.

Additional educational requirements for advancement in the field

2.

An accelerated learner may desire to go into the community and interview persons in the accounting profession so that he may evaluate his future possibilities and direction in the profession.

3.

If the accounting clerk profession does not seem to be the best area of study for the learner, he may research three related occupations and talk with school personnel such as instructors and counselors about modifying his career preparation.

143

11 :8

ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES

The assessment procedure for this lesson will be for the instructor to determine whether the learner "passThe responses es" or "fails" the pretest and posttest. to the assessment items will differ with each individIf the learner takes the test(s) and is able ual. to describe personal strengths and area(s) for improvement and express his opinion of accounting as a possible career choice, he will pass the test. If the learner cannot describe FOUR of his personal strengths or an area for improvement after careful self-examination, the instructor may determine that the learner has met this part of the performance objective because the answer given is complete. The learner's conclusions, if factual, perceptive, and relevant, should not determine whether he passes or fails the assessment items. Responses such as, "My goal in life is to become an accountant for the underworld so that I can cheat the federal government out of millions of dollars every year," "I flunked business math, and I've spent triple the amount of time on each lesson, but I'm going to become an accounting clerk in my father's company," and "I'm going to try it for awhile to see what it is like,", may not be the desired responses to the assessment item, but they do express the learner's opinion of accounting as a possible carder choice.

14 4'4'`

4

LESSON ELEVEN

PRETEST KEY

1.

Describe four of your personal strengths in relation to the accounting clerk profession. a.

b.

c.

d.

2.

Describe an area where you need to improve yourself in relation to the accounting clerk profession.

3.

Evaluate the accounting clerk profession as a possible career choice based upon your performance in the lessons and personal preference.

The responses to these items will differ. The learner may use his background, success on the performance objectives, responses to the worksheet, and interests to answer these items.

145

120 dfla

LESSON ELEVEN

POSTTEST KEY 1.

Describe four of your personal strengths in relation to the accounting clerk profession. a.

b.

c.

d.

2.

Describe an area where you need to improve yourself in relation to the accounting clerk profession.

3.

Evaluate the accounting clerk profession as a possible career choice based upon your performance in the lessons and personal preference.

The responses to these items will differ.

The

learner may use his background, success on the performance objectives, responses to the worksheet, and interests to answer these items. 147

121

APPENDIX

122

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST DIRECTIONS FOR THE INSTRUCTOR 1.

Administer the test to the learner according to the directions given.

2.

Correct the test and record the number of correct responses on the summary sheet.

3.

Because the test is used as a diagnostic instrument, there is not a standard or desired score that must be attained by the learner before he may proceed in the lessons.

The writers suggest that if the learner does not achieve an overall score of 50% or better, the instructor should examine the individual sections of the test. A weakness in one area may indicate that the learner needs to review this area of mathematics before he begins the lessons. A low score in general may suggest that other tests be given to the learner so that the instructor may learn more about the learner's background and basic knowledge inthe accounting area. A second test that may be administered is the "Accounting Form S," published Orientation Test, High School Level by the American Institute of Certifie,4 Public Accountants, 666 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York '10019. An IBM form answer sheet is also available for use with this test.

.r

151

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST CLASS

NAME Directions:

DATE

You will have exactly ten minutes to complete The total test each section of this test. will take 40 minutes. Complete all of the questions on page 1 (Section 1) when your instructor tells you Do not turn to page 2 until you to begin. (Make sure you go over are told to-ao so. each section thoroughly a second time if you'complete the section before the instructor stops you.)

ARITHMETIC

SECTION I 1.

Add:

5.

11,387.43 856.58 6,139.72 23,608.43 72.90

2.

Subtract:

18 19 22 14

6.

14,102.34 6,173.38

8.

Add:

42 7/8 T 1 3/4=

3/5 7/10 1/2 4/5

Subtract:

Divide:

9.

25.43 - 15 3/4=

Change to a percent: (two decimal places) 51/80=

3.

4.

Multiply:

7.

Multiply:

649 1.84

15 x 3 3/5=

Divide:

Arithmetic Score

10.

Change to a percent: .0225=

1.26/9.57-b

DO NOT TURN THE PAGE UNTIL YOUR INSTRUCTOR TELLS, YOU TO DO SO. 141`"--1

153

BOOM: ACCOPN..

S, RE.CORP,EZ:

.1

%ND

APNTUDE SECTION II

h.S.IRACT

1.

If 7 is 3 core than a number, what is the number'

2.

If 6 is 2 lcigs -than a number, what is the number'

3.

If 12 is 4 less than twice a number, what is the number'

4.

If 5 is 3 less than half of a number, what is the number'

5.

If 23 is 2 less than a number squared, what is the number'

6.

If 6 is 4 less than 5 times a number, what is the number'

7.

If 15 is 5 more than 5 times a number, what is the number'

8.

If 14 is 10 more tha n 1/5 of a number, what is the number'

9.

If 50 is twice a number squared, what is the number'

.

10.

If twice a number is 5 more than the number, what is the number?

11.

If twice a number is 7 more than the number, what is the number?

12.

What is the number when 10 divided by the number is 5 ?.

13.

What is the number when 10 times the number is 1907

14.

If three times the number is 5 more than twice the number, what is the number'

15.

If twice the number is the number, what is the number,

16.

If 25 percent of a number is 75 less than the number, what is the number'

155

125

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST (Continued)

SECTION II

17.

If 4 is 1/3 more than the number, what is the number

18.

If a number is increased by 23 percent of itself, it is 40. What is the number'

Abstract Reasoning Score

DO NOT TURN THE PAGE UNTIL Y' JR INSTRUCTOR TELLS YOU TO DO SO.

157

BOOKKEEPING. RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST (Continued) SECTION III

FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS

Write in blank 1 the number of e's appearing in this sentence.

In blank 2 write a capital d.

1.

In

2.

blank 3 write the sum of 5 and 2, and in blank 4

3.

write the sum of the numbers in blanks 1 and 3.

4.

Now write the year in blank 5 and in blank 6 write

5.

the abbreviation for Monday. appears in blank 2.

In blank 7 write what 6.

Write the difference between

43 and 35 in blank 8.

Write the number of days in

7. 8.

a leap year in blank 9, the number of months in a

9-

year in blank 10, and the number of days in three

10.

weeks in blank 11.

11.

Write a zero in blank 12, the

sum of 15 and 18 in blank 13, and the difference

12.

between 24 and 17 in blank 14.

13.

Write the sum of

the numbers in blanks 12, 13, and 14 in blank 15.

14.

In blank 16 write the third letter of the alphabet 15. in capital form. answer to 5x6. 3x10.

In the next blank, write the

16.

In blank 18, write the answer to

17.

If the answers in blanks 17 and 18 are the

18.

same, write a 5 in blank 19 and if the answers are

19.

not the same, write a 10 in blank 19.

20.

abbreviation for Saturday in blank 20.

Write the Now write

21.

the number of blanks you have filled up to blank

22.

21 in blank 21.

23.

Write the answer to one half of

$16 in blank 22, and in blank 23 write one quarter

24.

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST (Continued)

SECTION III

of what you wrote in blank 22.

25.

Write in capital

form the 10th letter in the alphabet in blank 24.

*26.

If T comes before Q in the alphabet, write an X

27.

in blank 25; if T doesn't come before Q, write a

28.

Z in blank 25.

29.

Write in capital form the letter

in the alphabet that follows t in blank 26.

Put

30.

in blank 27 the number you wrote in blank 23. Write 5 percent of 40 in blank 28.

If the numbers

32.

that now appear in blanks 27 and 28 are the same,

33.

write the number 17 in blank 29; if the numbers are

34.

different, write the number 16 in blank 29.

Write

the number of things there are in a dozen in blank 30.

Write 2 1/2 percent of $80 in blank 21.

Write

in blank 32 the difference between the numbers in blanks 30 and 31.

Write in blank 33 the sum of the

numbers in blanks 30 and 31.

Determine which of

the numbers in blanks 30, 32, and 33 is the smallest and' write it in blank 34.

Following Instructions Score

DO NOT TURN THE PAGE UNTIL YOUR INSTRUCTOR TELLS YOU TO DO SO.

161

128

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST (Continued) SECTION IV 1.

LOGICAL REASONING

If one shirt cost $2.00, how much will five shirts cost if you buy them on sale at 1/2 price')

2.

If one number is 5 and another number is 4, then 3 times the sum of the two numbers is?...

3.

If 7 x 7 is written 7 2 , how would you write A x A')

4.

If 8 x 8 is written 8 2 , how would you write 8 x 8 x 8')

5.

4 + 5 - 3

6.

If 1/2 the number is 4, then twice the number

8 + 6 equals what number')

is.,

7.

If 1/2 of 4 times the number is 10, the number is')

8.

9.

'If 24 is 32 less than 4 times the number, then what is the number') If the number is 1/2 of 6

2 ,

then what is the

number') 10.

If one number is 4 and another number 3, what does 2 times the square of the first number plus 3 times the second number equal?..

11.

One number is 23 and another number is 7. What is the square root of the difference')

12.

Find two numbers whose sum is 120 if the large number is five times larger than the smaller one

13.

14.

A class is composed of 25 students. Ten of these students are 16 years old and the rest are 15 years old. If 20 of the students passed the course, what percent of the total number of students failed') If 1/4 of 1/2 of a number is 5, what is the number') .1. a

tAw0 163

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST (Continued) 15.

SECTION IV

If the number is 2, what is 3 times the number squared')

16.

If a number squared equals 2 times the number, what is the number')

17.

You work in a store for one day and get paid $1 and hour for the first 8 hours plus time and a half for overtime. How much would you earn if you worked from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. with one hour allowed for lunch')

18.

A number is divided by itself and the answer is 1/3 of the number. What is the number')

19.

What is the number when 1/3 of the number is 8 more than 1/5 of the number')

20.

If 30 is 200 percent more than 3 times 1/4 the number, what is the number')

Logical Reasoning Score

165

.

SUMMARY SECTION I

SECTION II SECTION III

SECTION IV

TOTAL

1.31.

167

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST KEY NAME

CLASS

Directions:

DATE

You will have exactly ten hanutes to complete each section of this test. The total test will take 40 minutes. Complete all of the questions on page 1 (Section 1) when your instructor tells you to begin. Do not turn to page 2 until you are told to do so. (MAW sure you go over each section thoroughly a second time if you complete the section before the instructor stops you.)

SECTION 1 1.

Add:

5.

11,387.43 856.58 6,139.72 23,608.43

ARITHMETIC

Add:

18 19 22 14

8.

3/5 7/10 1/2 4/5

Divide:

42 7/8 + 1 3/4=24.5

- 72.90

42,065.06 2.

Subtract:

6.

14,102.34 6,173.38 7,928.96 3.

Multiply:

649 1.84 1194.16 4.

Subtract:

9.

25.43 - 15 3/4= 9.68

Change to a percent: (two decimal places) 51/80=

7.

Multiply:

10.

63.75 %

Change to a percent:

15 x 3 3/5= 54__ .0225=

Divide:

Arithmetic Score

7.6

1.26/9.576

DO NOT TURN THE PAGE UNTIL YOUR INSTRUCTOR TELLS YOU TO DO SO.

169

132

2.25 %

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST KEY (Continued)

SECTION II 1.

ABSTRACT REASONING

If 7 is 3 more than a number, what is the number"

4

2.

if 6 is 2 less than a number, what is the number?

3.

If 12 is 4 less than twice a number, what is the number"

8

If 5 is 3 less than half of a number, what is the number"

16

If 23 is 2 less than a number, squared, what is the number"

5

If 6 is 4 less than 5 times a number, what is the number"

2

If 15 is 5 more than 5 times a number, what is the number"

2

If 14 is 10 more than 1/5 of a number, what is the number?

20

If 50 is twice a number squared, what is the number"

5

If twice a number is 5 more than the number, what is the number"

5

If twice a number is 7 more than the number, what is the number"

7

What is the number when 10 divided by the number is 5"

2

What is the number when 10 times the number is 120"

12

If three times the number is 5 more than twice the number, what is the number?

5

If twice the number is the number, what is the number"

0

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.

14.

15.

16.

If 25 percent of a number is 75 less than the number, what is the number"

170

100

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST KEY (Continued) 17.

18.

SECTION II

If 4 is 1/3 more than the number, what is the nuniber'

3

If a number is increased by 25 percent of itself, it is 40. What is the number?

32

Abstract Reasoning Score

DO NOT TURN THE PAGE UNTIL YOUR INSTRUCTOR TELLS YOU TO DO SO.

171

134

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST KEY (Continued) SECTION III

FOLLOWING DIRECTIONS

Write in blank 1 the number of e's appearing in

1.

8

2.

D

blank 3 write the sum of 5 and 2, and in blank 4

3.

7

write the sum of the numbers in blanks 1 and 3.

4.

15.

Now write the year in blank 5 and in blank 6 write

5.

the appreviation for Monday.

6.

Mon.

7.

D

8.

8

a leap year in blank 9, the number of months in a

9.

366

year in blank 10, and the number qf days in three

10.

12

weeks in blank 11.

11.

21

sum of 15 and 18 in blank 13, and the difference

12.

0

between 24 and 17 in blank 14.

13.

33

14.

7

In blank 16 write the third letter of the alphabet

15.

40

in capital form.

In the next blank, write the

16.

C

In blank 18, write the answer to

17.

30

18.

30

same, write a 5 in blank 19 and if the answers are

19.

5

not the same, write a 10 in blank 19.

20.

Sat.

21.

20

this sentence.

In blank 2 write a capital d.

appears in blank 2.

In blank 7 write what

Write the difference between

43 and 35 in blank 8.

Write the number of days in

Write a zero in blank 12, the

Write the sum of

the numbers in blanks 12, 13, and 14

answer to 5x6. 3x10.

In

blank 15.

If the answers in blanks 17 and 18 are the

abbreviation for Saturday in blank 20.

Write the Now write

the number of blanks you have filled up to blank

22.

$8

Write the answer to one half of

23.

$2

24.

J

21 in blank 21.

$16 in blank 22, and in blank 23 write one quarter

1 ?5

172

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPAG, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST KEY (Continued) of what you wrote in blank 22.

SECTION III

Write in' capital

25.

Z

form the 10th letter in the alphabet in blank 24.

26.

U

If T comes before Q in the alphabet, write an X

27.

2

in blank 25; if T doesn't come before Q, write a

28.

2

Z in blank 25.

29.

17

30.

12

Write in capital form the letter

in the alphabet that follows t in blank 26.

Put

in blank 27 the number you wrote in blank 23.

31.

Write 5 percent of 40 in blank 28.

32.

10

that now appear in blanks 27 and 28 are the same,

33.

14

write the number 17 in blank 29; if the numbers are

34.

10

If the numbers

different, write the number 16 in blank 29.

Write

the number of things there are in a dozen in blank 30.

Write 2 1/2 percent of $80 in blank 21.

Write

in blank 32 the difference between the numbers in blanks 30 and 31.

Write in blank 33 the sum of the

numbers in blanks 30 and 31.

Determine which of

the numbers in blanks 30, 32, and 33 is the smallest and write it in blank 34.

Following Instructions Score

DO NOT TURN THE PAGE UNTIL YOUR INSTRUCTOR TELLS YOU TO DO SO.

173

136

$2.00

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST KEY (Continued)

SECTION IV 1.

2.

LOGICAL REASONING

If one shirt cost $2.00, how much will five shirts cost if you buy them on sale at 1/2 price" If one number is 5 and another number is 4, then 3 times the sum of the two numbers is?... 2

how would you write

$5.00

27

3.

If 7 x 7 is written 7 A x A"

4.

If 8 x 8 is written 8 , how would you write 8 x 8 x 8"

8

5.

4 + 5 - 3 - 8 + 6 equals what number"

+4

6.

If 1/2 the number is 4, then twice the number

,

A2

2

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

is"

16

If 1/2 of 4 times the number is 10, the number is"

5

If 24 is 32 less than 4 times the number, then what is the number"

14

If the number is 1/2 of 6 number"

2 ,

then what is the 18

If one number is 4 and another number 3, what does 2 times the square of the first number plus 3 times the second number equal?..

41

One number is 23 and another number is 7. What is the square root of the difference"

4

Find two numbers whose sum is 120 if the large number is five times larger than the smaller 20/100

one 13.

14.

3

Ten of A class is composed of 25 students. these students are 16 years old and the rest If 20 of the students are 15 years old. passed the course, what percent of the total number of students failed?

20%

If 1/4 of 1/2 of a number is 5, what is the number"

40

174

:127

BOOKKEEPING, RECORDKEEPING, AND ACCOUNTING APTITUDE TEST KEY (Continued) 15.

16.

17.

18.

19.

20.

SECTION IV

If the number is 2, what is 3 times the number squared'?

12

If a number squared equals 2 times the number, what is the number'?

2

You work in a store for one day and get paid $1 and hour for the first 8 hours plus time and a half for overtime. How much would you earn if you worked from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. with one hour allowed for lunch'?

$15.50

A number is divided by itself and the answer is 1/3 of the number. What is the number'?

3

What is the number when 1/3 of the number is 8 more than 1/5 of the number'?

60

If 30 is 200 percent more than 3 times 1/4 the number, what is the number'?

20

Logical Reasoning Score

138 175

QUESTIONNAIRE

The purposes of the questionnaire are to help me get know you better, to select proper learning materials your use, to help me complete required school forms, to give you practice in filling out forms similar to used in the business world.

to for and ones

NAME

Last MALE

FEMALE

First AGE

Middle

DATE OF BIRTH

ADDRESS Street State

City

Zip Code

SOCIAL SECURITY NUMBER

GRADE

PAST GRADE-POINT AVERAGE

PHONE

PROGNOSTIC SCORE

STANINE

APTITUDE Leave Blank

Leave Blank

Leave Blank

List adult members of family and their occupations. Company

Title City

State

Company

Title City

State

Title

Company

City

State

1K19 177

QUESTIONNAIRE (Continued)

AGES AND OCCUPATIONS OF BROTHERS

AGES AND OCCUPATIONS OF SISTERS

OCCUPATIONAL AND EDUCATIONAL PLANS AFTER HIGH SCHOOL

PREVIOUS MATHEMATICS COURSES

LIST ALL BUSINESS COURSES YOU HAVE TAKEN PREVIOUSLY AND THE GRADE YOU RECEIVED.

LIST ALL COURSES PRESENTLY ENROLLED IN. (1)

(A)

(2)

(3)

(4)

(5)

(6)

(7) PAST WORK EXPERIENCE (TYPE OF WORK AND HOW LONG)

140

179

QUESTIONNAIRE (Continued)

MAJOR REASONS FOR STUDYING THIS UNIT

ARE YOU PRESENTLY EMPLOYED?

IF SO, WHERE?

TYPE OF WORK HOW MANY HOURS PER WEEK?

WHAT DO YOU LIKE ABOUT YOUR SCHOOL?

HOW MAY THIS COURSE HELP YOU GET A JOB WHEN YOU LEAVE SCHOOL?

WHAT DO YOU DISLIKE MOST ABOUT COURSES BEING OFFERED AT THIS SCHOOL?

WHAT ARE YOUR PRESENT HOBBIES?

LIST EXTRA-CURRTCULAR ACTIVITIES IN SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY.

141 181

QUESTIONNAIRE (Continued)

LIST ANY PHYSICAL HEALTH CHARACTERISTICS THAT MIGHT INFLUENCE YOUR BEHAVIORAL OR LEARNING PATTERN.

WHERE DID YOU ATTEND SCHOOL LAST YEAR?

142 183

H ,11.110.41MMIen.00111.101111W

BIBLIOGRAPHY

BOOKS

Boynton, Lewis D., Paul A. Carlson, Hamden L. Forkner, and Robert M. Swanson. 20th Century Bookkeepinv 23rd Edition. Cincinnatti, Ohio: and Accounting. South-Western Publishing Company, 1967. Boynton, Lewis D., Robert M. Swanson, Paul A. Carlson, Century 21 Accounting. and Hamden L. Forkner. South-Western Publishing Cincinnatti, Ohio: Company, 1972. Freeman, M. Herbert, J Marshall Hanna, and Gilbert Xahn. Accounting 10/12. New York, New York: Gregg Division, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1968. Freeman, M. Herbert, J Marshall Hanna, Gilbert Kahn, and David H. Weaver. Accounting 10/12. Second Gregg Division, New York, New York: Edition. McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1973. Huffman, Harry, Jeffrey R. Stewart, Jr., and Arnold R. New York, New Schneider. General Recordkeeping. Gregg Division, McGraw-Hill Book Company, York: 1971.

Kahn, Gilbert, Theodore Yerian, and Jeffrey R. Stewart, Eighth Edition. New Progressive Filing. Jr. York, New York: Gregg Division, McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1969. Teletraininq for Business Studies. and Telegraph Company, 1965.

American Telephone

United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Employment Dictionary. of Occupational Titles, Vol. I, Security. Definitions of Titles. Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1965.

143

187

)10

BIBLIGGRAPHY (Continued)

United States Department of Labor, Bureau of Labor 1972-73. Statistics. Occupational Outlook Handbook: Washington, D.C.: Government Printing Office, 1972. Walker, Arthur L., J. Kenneth Roach, and J Marshall Hanna. How to Use Adding and Calculating Machines. Third Edition. New York, New York: Gregg Division. McGraw-Hill Book Company, 1967.

OTHER SOURCES

"Accounting Orientation Test, High School Level - Form S." The American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. New York, New York, 1965. Drills and Problems in Bookkeeping Carlson, Arthur E. and Accounting. Cincinnatti, Ohio: South-Western Publishing Company, 1959. Frame, Terry M. "The Relationships Between Tasks Performed by Selected Office Employees and Office Education Students." Unpublished doctoral disserNorthern Illinois University, January, 1971. tation.

Perkins, Edward A., Ross F. Byrd, and Dennis E. Roley. Clusters of Tasks Associated with Performance of Major Types of Office Work. Washington State University Department of Education, January, 1968. "A Study of the Bookkeeping and Stelter, Galye A. Accounting Duties Performed and Automatic Equipment Used by Bookkeeping and Accounting Employees in Rural Minnesota Businesses." Unpublished doctoral dissertation. Northern Illinois University, August, 1968.

114 188

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